(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The Eagle"


lilnl 



\ 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

CARL!: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois 



http://www.archive.org/details/eagle36illi 



Theodore Lewnik Library 

Nlinois Benedictine College 

Lisle, Illinois 60532 



1984 EAGLE 




w ^ 

CONTENTS . o 

e 10 \^ 

page Ai(4\v 

page 66 

pa| 

page 106 
page 140 



As you journey through these pages 



to a time now gone 



Cherish what you see 
for what you see is your own story 





Shining Memories 

Gather 'round friends — hear this tale so fine 
Which tells our story of tears and laughter 
Let's speak together of memories that shine 
From the start of this year and the time thereafter 

Our tale begins finding new friends and old 
At dances, eating pizza, and parties by the slough 
Each looking to make it in the IBC mold 
While looking ahead to the work we must do 

The pace now quickens as the tale picks up steam 

With tests, papers and assignments due 

Putting it all on the line to chase our dream 

It's the last minute panic — "We'll cram until two!' 

Our first finals soon finish, a break is in need 
We find our way home for the Yuletide season 
Too soon — back to the book work we lead 
And all the headaches of thought and reason 

Studies continue — a new semester rolls on 
Then Spring gets sprung and the flowers all bloom 
God help us to finals — they're almost upon 
Procrastinate madness — our grades are in doom 

Then comes the final scene of our long school year 
We each sigh and cue a dramatic pause 
And from our eyes falls a single tear 
When we turn and face the house applause 

We each are the cast of this living play 
The curtain falls — you may bow if you please 
Looking back only once we find our own way 
It is all ours forever — these Shining Memories 

Phil Montefalco 
George Trumbull 



Campus Life 



Take Time to Read 



Attention. Consider . . . 

Read not to contradict and confute: nor to believe 
and take for granted, nor to find talk and dis- 
course; but to weigh and consider. Some books are 
to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few 
to be chewed and digested; that is, some books are 
to be read only in parts, others to be read, but not 
curiously, and some few to be read wholly, and 
with diligence and attention. 

Francis Bacon 



Having found a quiet place in the library, Joe Booth reads with 
intensity (right). 




Curiously. Ginny Gardner reads the 'Dear Abby' column con- 
cerning love (above). 

Reading the microbiology laboratory manual. Frank Garland 
becomes a weli-mformed teachmg assistant (right;." 




>J 



12 Campus Life 



Taking time out of her busy schedule, Maureen Stu- 
ever pages through a magazine (left). 

Anticipating a histology examination, Tony Bell dili- 
gently studies his text (below). 




ocnerrsis?. Lehninger 



Knowledge without wisdom is a load of books on the 
back of an ass — Japanese proverb (above). 

Attentively, Leigh Thompson reads and transcribes a 
computer printout (left). 



It is the Fountain of Wisdom 



Read 13 



Take Time to Think 



The Thinker 



When God lets loose a great thinker on this planet, 
then all things are at risk. — There is not a piece 
of science, but its flank may be turned to-morrow; 
nor any literary reputation, nor the so-called 
eternal names of fame, that may not be revised and 

condemned. 




14 Campus Life 




Preparing to ultracentrifuge solutions for bio- 
chemical research. Tom Ruff thoughtfully bal- 
ances the weight of his samples (left). 




Deep in thought, Liz Dvorak accurately takes 
notes in class (above). 

In Physical Chemistry Laboratory, Mary Jo 
Schwarz and Sheila Czapski study 'iodine 
clock' kinetics (left). 



It is the Source of Power 



Think 15 



Take Time to Work 



To the Man in the Arena 

It is not the critic who counts, not the man who points 
out how the strong man stumbled or where the doer of 
deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to 
the man who is actually in the arena; whose face is 
marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiant- 
ly; who errs and comes short again and again; who 
knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions, and 
spends himself in a worthy cause; who, at the best knows 
the triumph of high achievement; and who. at the worst, 
if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his 
place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who 
know neither victory nor defeat. 



In mid-air, defensive back Doug Walent l24) vainly strives to intercept an (jfet- 
opponent's pass (right). (-:"^i^? 




16 Campus Life 




With perfect poise and technique, a SAGA 
worker prepares a cheeseburger for a student 
(left). 

Working on her biochemical research topic, 
Mary Wong records data (above). 



It is the Price of Success 



Work 17 



Take Time to Play 



Youth 



How beautiful is youth I How bright it gleams 

With its illusions, aspirations, dreams! 

Book of Beginnings, Story without end, 

Each maid a heroine, and each man a friend! 
Aladdin's Lamp, and Fortunatus" Purse, 
That holds the treasures of the universe! 

Longfellow 




'On guard, Darth Vader'' dares Steve Doekery (right). 



,ftJ^"'^■^,^ ■^V^fl^'<SSs„;:'I^^l?«a. ^^JS^aKy -x^-WCciij^^^^SiSier* 




Believing that their soeial life is at least as important as their aca- 
demic life, Bill McGuire, Sandy Kozubowski, Jill, Diane Connolly, 
Mary Rose Vokurka, Paula Novak, and Ed Schmelzer play a few 
rounds of Uno (above). 

'Humph! So you thought you could score better me," Leigh Thomp- 
son triumphantly brags lo defeated Chuck Peterson (right). 




18 Campus Life 




Testing their Icnowledge of trivia, Mar- 
cia Menke. Bernie O'Malley. and Kerry 
Sugrue are in avid pursuit of their 
pieces of the pie (left). 

Dr. Hyslop's Birthday was a day of role 
reversal; students planned a 'lecture" us- 
ing teaching aids to teach Tail Pinning 
100 and Bell Dancing 101 (below). 




It is the Secret of Perpetual Youth 



Plavful Youth 19 



Take Time to be Friendly 



What is a Friend? 



What is a friend? I will tell you. It is a person with whom 
you dare to be yourself. Your soul can be naked with 
him. He seems to ask of you to put on nothing, only to be 
what you are. He does not want you to be better or 
worse. When you are with him, you feel as a prisoner 
feels who has been declared innocent. You do not have 
to be on your guard. You can say what you think, so long 
as it is genuinely you. He understands those contradic- 
tions in your nature that lead others to misjudge you. 
With him you breathe freely. You can avow your little 
vanities and envies and hates and vicious sparks, your 
meanness and absurdities and, in opening them up to 
him, they are lost, dissolved on the white ocean of his 
loyalty. He understands. You do not have to be careful. 
You can abuse him, neglect him, tolerate him. Best of 
all, you can keep still with him. It makes no matter. He 
likes you — he is like fire that purges to the bone. He 
understands. He understands. You can weep with him, 
sing with him, laugh with him, pray with him. Through 
it all — and underneath — he sees, knows and loves you. 
A friend? What is a friend? Just one, I repeat, with 

whom you dare to be yourself. 

Ra\ mond Boran 




Must Friends': Al Nune? and .lohn Marshall (upper right). 

Enjoying the spring weather, Magda Limberis and Ginny Olson stroll 
about campus (above). 

During a playful moment, Patli Donnelly gives Donna Kliver a surprise 
hug (right). 



20 Campus Life 





Pals, Corinne Danhauer and Trish Keporos, Ondrak Hall 
counselor, take pleasure in each other's company (left). 

Smiling, Ho Sung Pak and Sue McCarthy keep company 
(below). 





Pi 




■ 








^^1 


^^^^^^^^R^ '"^vV^H 


^T* *^ 


\i 


■H 


^I^Bl.^-^ m 


^ft 


r 


^% 


^HB ^^ 


> 






^^^^B ^L^ 






. ...^' ■'" 





.laeger crime stoppers, Phil Moore and Larry Bettag, are 
good buddies (center left). 

'I knew that you'd forgive me, good buddy,' says a relieved 
Bill Steele to Rodell Holley (above). 

Maureen Pencak, Mike Allen, Joan Severyns, and Dave 
Lopez 'anonymously' celebrate Homecoming in the Ea- 
gle's Nest (left). 



It is the Road to Happiness 



Friends 



Take Time to Laugh 



Killer Boffo 



In the language of screen comedians, tour of the main 
grades of laugh are the titter, the yowl, the belly laugh, 
and the boffo. The titter is just a titter. The yowl is a 
runaway titter. Anyone who has ever had the pleasure 
knows all about a belly laugh. The boffo is the laugh 
that kills. 

James Agee 



A killer borfo l.s shared by Mike Allen and Jennie Bourke when 
Belly Dancing 101 is "lecture" of the day (right). 




front: Jim Hawkins, Jeff Medland; back: Dan Kowalzyk, and Tom 
Ruff enjoy the pertbrmance given by Dr. Hyslop and belly dancer 
friend during his birthday celebration (above). 

"No way, did she really get caught doing that? What a riot!" 
chuckle front: Kathy Weber, Beth Eckman, Lisa Corrigan, 
Melody Crivello; back: Mary Ann Vacante and Jeanne Manning 
(right). 




Campus Life 




Laughing, Sandy Kozubowski exclaims. 'Now I've heard 
It all!' (above). 

'You got him for my birthday?!' Carol Miller questions 
aughingly (left). 



It is the Music of the Soul 



Laugh 23 



Take Time to Love and Be Loved 



The Gift of Love 

Love is patient, love is kind. Love is not jealous, it 
does not put on airs, it is not snobbish. Love is nev- 
er rude, it is not self-seeking, it is not prone to an- 
ger; neither does it brood over injuries. Love does 
not rejoice in what is wrong, but rejoices with the 
truth. There is no limit to love's forbearance, its 
truth, its hope, its power to endure. 

St. Paul to the Corinthians 



Hugging. Dan Keating and his date share a little body heat 

(right). 




In love, Fred Runge and Karen Scaletta gaze deeply into each 
other's eyes (right). 

Having found a peaceful spot on campus. Lori Giancola and Don 
Sciackitano enjoy some time together (above). 





24 Campus Life 



Bill Wojcik and Nancy Bonczyk share some ro- 
mance al the Senior Ball (below). 




Expressing their sisterly affection, Ginny and Hol- 
ly Olson warmly hug (above). 

Kevin Landers gallantly sweeps Cathy Stiglianese 
off her feet (left). 



It is the Privilege of the Gods 



Love 25 



Take Time to Look Around 



Golden Movements 

Life moves on. whether we act as cowards or he- 
roes. Life has no other discipline to impose, if we 
would but realize it. than to accept life unquestion- 
ing!}.. Ever\thing we shut our eyes to. everything 
we run away from, ever) thing we deny, denigrate 
or despise, serves to defeat us in the end. What 
seems nasty, painful, evil, can become a source of 
beauty, joy and strength, if faced with an open 
mind. Every movement is a golden one for him who 
has the vision to recognize it as such. 

Henrv Miller 



Not wanting to miss out on any interesting molecular motion. Dr, 
'Captain of Organic' Rausch peers around the corner to see what 
caused some commotion (right). 





*^.?»* 



•*i*S^- 






it 








m 


W^ 



Common sites around the I. B.C. Campus Community include 
statues of the Virgin Mary, geese, and abloom flowers (above). 

Turning to see whom they could assist next. Sue Parks and Al Nunez 
are surprised, but delighted, to see an old fnend (right). 





26 Campus Life 




With a quick turn, Frank O'Brien gives a smile 
and a wave (above). 

Looking out at the slough. Jane Marchctto excit- 
edly points out something unusual to Dino 
Rumoro (upper right). 



The Day is too Short to be Selfish 



Look Around 27 



Take Time to Dream 



Ideals 



Ideals are like stars; you will not succeed in 

touching them with your hands. But like the 

seafaring man on the desert of waters, you 

choose them as your guides, and following 

them you will reach your destiny. 

Carl Schurz 



MImicing E.T. by hiding among her beasties, Mary Rose 
Vokurka dreams of life on Pluto (right). 











Tony Bell curls up for a long winter's nap (above). 

'I am out lor the night. If I get drunk, tape this card to my 
head and send me home. Please ring the bell, then run like 
hell. Fragile — handle with care.' read the instructions 
affixed to .lohn 'Poobles" Marshall's forehead (center). 

With Teddy to calm down any fears. Rich Rupkalvis 
dreams of the Chinese practice of acupuncture (center 
right). 

Curled up with her favorite stuffed animals, Julie Janecke 
has visions of sugarplums and exams dancing in her head 
(right). 




28 Campus Life 




Gazing off. Marianne Hedin won- 
ders what IBC campus life will be 
like in the year 2001 (left). 

Dave Toennies and Jim Kavanagh 
dream of victory en route to a meet 
(below). 




It is Hitching Your Wagon to a Star _ 



Dream 29 



Residence Life Staff 



All halls are under the direct supervi- 
sion of the residence hall staff; con- 
sisting of a director, counselor, and 
student assistants for each hall. The 
hall staff attempts to maintain an en- 
vironment helpful to the academic, 
social, and personal development of 
resident students, and is trained to be 
of help in all aspects of campus life. 
Typical resident assistant duties in- 
clude: serving as 'police" in personal 
disputes, if necessary; acting as a re- 
sounding board, and giving advice; 
serving as 'trustee' of the vacuum and 
t.p.; and opening doors for those who 
have managed to lock themselves out. 



KOHLBECK HALL RESIDENCE LIFE 
STAFF, front: Emma Butts, .left Henry, Fr. 
Ralph, Mike Buck; second: Karen Lee, Mike 

Allen (upper right). 

ONDRAK HALL RESIDENCE LIFE 
STAFF, front: Nancy Westenberger; second; 
Marcia Menkc, Cindy Chase; third: Kay Heth- 
erington (center right). 




JAEGER AND PARADISE HALLS RESI- 
DENCE LIFE STAFF, front: Phil Monte- 
falco, Larry Bettag; second; Jaime Escobedo, 
Br. Robert, Br. Richard, Phil Moore (lower 
right). 

NEUZIL HALL RESIDENCE LIFE 
STAFF. Jeff Medland, Joanne Stohs, Dr. 
Mark Stohs (above). 




32 Residence Life 



Paradise Hall 




Referred to by administrators as the 
'Benedictine Annex,' and by some 
students as 'Jaeger South, Paradise 
Hail is located at the southwestern tip 
of Benedictine Hall. Noted for its 
small population, 17 young men live 
in the hall, in rooms that are a 'half of 
a room wide and one and a half rooms 
tall." Despite the fact that the hall has 
no live-in dorm director, the atmos- 
phere is conducive to studying. 

With dandelions In their hair. The Paradise 
Luge Team prepares for an afternoon of spring 
sledding, front: Mike Kavanaugh; second: Nor- 
bert Purcell, John Kennedy, Jim Widiowski, 
Dino Rumoro, Scott Plaehn, Mark LeMonnier 
(upper left). 

Dmo Rumoro: the IBC Doughboy (below). 




P.ARADISE HALL, front: Tom Dillenburg. Jeff 
Branibora: second: Scott Plaehn, Joe Coscino: 
third: Jim Widiowski. Mark LeMonnier; fourth: 
Tom Murray, Mike Menolasino; fifth: Bob 
Ching. Jaime Escobedo: sixth: Al Nunez; seventh: 
Dino Rumoro, Mike Kavanaugh, John Kennedy. 
.Martin .Melin (lower left). 



Residence Life Staff/Paradise Hall 33 



Jaeger Hall 



Animal House 

Jaeger Hall is a home away from 
home for the undergraduates who live 
there, that is, if your home life resem- 
bles life in an animal house. Notori- 
ous for their chaotic behavior, the 
Jaeger boys constantly played practi- 
cal jokes. Very active, a passer-by of- 
ten saw residents on the front lawn 
playing softball, baseball, golf, and 
frisbee. At high noon, a 'mystery 
man' amplified the 'Star Spangled 
Banner", signaling the beginning of 
his day, and that women are now free 
to enter, legally. Among the resi- 
dents, much comradeship and floor 
unitv was evident. 



Hearing tliLil walking up. stairs is good exercise, 
Ed Gannon walks his bicycle up and dow n the 
stairs in Jaeger Hall (near right). 

Bob Mertz struts down the hall (far right). 

Rich Sullivan threatens to beat up medical as- 
sistant Mike Martirano for "drugs' (lower 
right). 

Rob Johnson is very practical; his bar doubles 
as an ironing board (below). 





34 Residence Life 




JAEGER HALL, FIRST FLOOR. Ironl: Phil 
Montefaico; second: Mark Peskor, Mark Kli- 
mek, Kevin Kavanaugh. Johnny Koo; third: 
Dave Lewis, Joe, Mike Martirano; fourth: Rich 
Robertson, Tom StoH, Don StGermaine, John 
Wagner (left). 



JAEGER HALL, SECOND FLOOR (right) 




Jaeger Hall 35 



Ondrak Hall 




We are Family 

Deep in the back woods, by the par- 
tiers and slough monster, lies Ondrak 
Hall. Housing only females, it is li 
popular place to visit, or so say the 
Jaeger boys. To ward off the Jaeger 
boys, and other such animals, semi- 
nars on self-protection are offered to 
the residents. A feeling of family be- 
gins to develop between Ondrak resi- 
dents, sharing moments of joy, sor- 
row, and gossip, among their new- 
found 'family' members. 



Lounging around. Diane DiPietro and Melissa 
Trok enjoy their lack of homework (upper 
right). 

In a typical Ondrak pose, Ginny Gardner 
catches up on all the latest 'hot' news (center 

right). 

Half asleep, Mary Claire Kcblusek prepares to 
face the day (lower right). 

'Two heads work better than one.' or so they 
will explain to the teacher (below). 



36 Residence Life 




ONDRAK HALL, FIRST FLOOR, front: 
Diane Connolly, Ginny Olson, Nancy Wedoff, 
Melissa Trok, Gina Marie Lustyk; second: 
Jane Klamerus, Leeann Labus, Maureen Stu- 
ever, Kathy Weber, Caria Grennan, Kerry Su- 
grue, Belsy LaScala. Diane DiPietro; third: 
Mary Hogan, Carolyn Gawrysh, Sandy Kozu- 
bowski, Connie Nickels; fourth: Marcia 
Menke, Liz Dvorak (left). 



ONDRAK HALL, SECOND FLOOR, front: 
Lisa Corrigan, Beth Eckman, Patti Perrone; 
second: Cindy Chase, Leigh Thompson, two 
incognito, Michele Rodzak; third: Mary Rose 
Vokurka, Cindi Bitz, Jeanne Hnilicka, Phyllis 
Stopka; fourth: Amy Cottral (right). 





^^ ■ — ^*' 

ONDRAK HALL, THIRD FLOOR (left). 



Ondrak Hall 37 



Kohlbeck Hall 



Centrally located on campus, Kohl- 
beck Hall residents have convenient 
access to the library (what's that?), 
and the science building. It seems, 
though, that these more social, rowdy 
residents spend the majority of their 
time playing various sports on the 
field behind the dorm. Kohlbeck's un- 
usual feature is the 5:1. men to wom- 
en, ratio, which the women seem to 
enjoy. 



'And who's been sleeping in my bed while I've 
been gone," grimaces Frank Agnoli to smiling, 
fearless Frank Garland (upper right). 

'What do you mean we can't exchange views on 

this take-home test?' (center right). p 




Bill Moran adds a little culture to Kohihcck Hall 
(above). 

... after last night, I don't think I want to even Ji*?. ""* wC>"^"'>i^ft- 
see a beer' (lower right). ''*" ""'^ 




38 Residence Life 




^ KOHLBECK HALL, FIRST FLOOR (upper 

n left). 

KOHLBECK HALL, SECOND FLOOR 

(ccnlcr left). 

KOHLBECK HALL, THIRD FLOOR, 
SOUTH WING (lower left). 

KOHLBECK HALL, THIRD FLOOR, 
NORTH WING, front: Sherri Petrick, Jane 
Staten, Fr. Ted Suchy, Linda Pullano, Cathy 
Keely; second: Sharon Grebe, Cathy Lisy, 
Mary D'Appley, Lisa Bower; third: Ann Woj- 
cik. Colleen Coates, Theresa Maize; fourth: 
Laura Mraz, Karen Lee, Betsy Knox, Jean 
Powell, Agnes, Terri Luzader (below). 



Kohlbeck Hall 39 



Neuzil Hall 



The Elite 



In the world of IBC, in a remote north 
section of campus, there lives a small 
community of upperclassmen. These 
residents of Neuzil Hall share the 
elite privileges of 24-hour visitation, 
private bathrooms, and 21-\ear old 
friends. 



With her notes in disarray, Liz Kus tries to 
make 'head or tails' of the assignment in front 
of her (right). 




S^ 





-<^^^-v 



, ^5?" .^^^^^^ 





Thinking the world of Paul Marchesc, Olga 
'Atlas' Garnica supports him (center right). 

Asking her teddy for advice. Terry Ensign 
counsels a student (right 

Afraid to face the day, Mary Kay Farrell gives 
a tremulous smile (above). 



40 Residence Life 




NEUZIL HALL, FIRST FLOOR, front: 
Joanne Stohs. Greg Kurcab, Steve Becker, Ray 
Summins, Kevin Russell, John Marshall Jim 
Crosson; second: Dr. Mark Stohs. Jim Brooks, 
.lohn Reinert, Mike Cooney, John O'Donneli, 
Dan Flynn; third: Jerry Hinley, Mark Sinz, 
Andy Sestak, Joe Possley, Brian Krajewski, 
Bruce Kuesis, Dave Wijas, John Gillenwater, 
Ed Kolar. Mike Sheridan, Dave Toennies; 
fourth: Bob Mosley, Jim Novak, Tim Nasshan, 
Dan Brennan, Bill Wojcik, John Casselman, 
Robbie Stablein, Joe Krol (left). 



NEUZIL HALL, SECOND FLOOR, front: 
Jackie Frederking, Beth Ward, Michelle 
Halm, Vicky Plys, Annette Markun; second: 
Judy Yost, Julie Pudlo, Connie Putz, Colette 
Drozd, Joanne Connolly, Louise Vitale; third: 
Sue Czerwinski, Linda Johnson, Marie 'Tree' 
Soltis, Rita Schultz, Mystery Woman, Sheila 
Czapski, Maureen Pencak; fourth: Terry En- 
sign, Cindy Knox, Donna Herlihey, Mary Ca- 
sey, Nancy Bonczyk, Kathy Klamerus, Olga 
Garnica, Leslie Darmofal, Peggy Prehn; fifth: 
Cathy Cummings, Mary Kalbfleisch, Marty, 
Anne Boddy, Jeanne Cronborg, Mary Kay 
Farrell, Ann O'Neill, Marci Svec, Julie Jan- 
ecke (right). 




^ ^ 

•^A^ 




NEUZIL HALL,TIIIRD FLOOR, front: Jim 
Hawkins. Wayne Dendler, Tom O'Connor, 
lim Fahey, Jerry Kilroy; second: Tim O'Brien, 
Don Johnson, Jim Miller, Joe Kirchner, Mike 
LaMargo, Bob McDonnell, Ken Hansen, Rich 
■Vlichaels, Kraig Kujawa, Larry UbI; third: 
Don Provenzale, Kevin Donovan, Mike Mur- 
ray, Jeff 'Herman' Medland, Gary Harvey, 
.Steve Staniszewski; fourth: Rich Steslow, Ed 
McNally, Jim Socha, Joe Stella, Bob Tracy 
(left). 



Neuzil Hall 41 



Devotion . . . Results . . . Winnina 



-he Rice Cenier 



loss "si:J: riscrccs w^crk-c^-s. I>ec:- 



'CX3Z5. ie iaIe:Qtsd is2ir! — enibsis led tie 



Jsiz p.- -i 






rlivec bv 2l_ - ?-.--— — e~bsrs, Mcs: ins r2.iion2l bids. 'I ■ail! alw-avs re- -^ =>'^^- < ^^-■•^^ '- 
Valuable Player. Sberr: Petrick: — e— ber lie fanissiic rersoieliiiei." 
Reekie CI lie Year. Maggie Brckle>:: rerdnisced Jacqui Morris. "-±e iarc 



TT f"j"0OL 01 ^ 1^~ 



\j2£3e Boije'. coQrs=r3S5 ti b^ ie: 




— iV; --— , 






i_jSL f^sss^ Cs^sfil- 





C,.—r.r^ 


I3_5 


C-,-?-?: S:^Di 


ij 


^--:-z^=^^7 T'-ri^ 


15-3-'.;- 


5.. Xi-ir 


9-13. 15.' 


Prizcz^^'- tre.2^n:£: 




N-ir'- Cc=--- 


6_5.-i 


rar r-x=---=rr?- 




DePs-: 


If.: :.:5-:5 


S-i-_-'-^e=r \r,~i^- 


5.S 


KiCV:^ 


ij 


AI^KS 


— ^ 


K^-irc:> 


16-5.15 


3.f--czec:^ 


11-4 


f-~-, Ir-7^»-^.n=' 




C-i^C-rr=:i 


-S.'Jz 


Rzci^T^ 


C-Z_1Z 


=^_-vc p,-f— [— i^-r=,-i-5' 




frrSi-iir 


"3-i_~ " 


--trcTi 


Il.c-5 


- -1— f=-.-:-T— ^ - '—^-.-.-^-.' 




---..- 


2_-Q_-- 


"%^-(=^--T- 


s.:3-:5J^ 


f:---t-^ 


:'S-:5.:5 


n^-r7? TS^~=-^ 


?-3'J^ 


f:----^ 


--^r 


r?--r-=£ 


~3 


!^— 'ffT 


:5-:'--i 


■S,"^- J?>-r--f':^^ 


:5.:5 


O-^.rH- X-=*--l?r-r= 


■;--ti5.* 


f>r^Tv-i :^n-r-r— ^ 


13^-10 


— _- _ 


-i -; -^ -:; 




vofaitea 45 



Hard Fought Battles 



The team, returning only 15 starters, 
three of them seniors, depended upon 
the leadership of All-American can- 
didate captain Joe Possley. Relying 
on the performance of the new re- 
cruits, tlie year was a period of learn- 
ing, coniniittmenl. and growth. 

Desiring to be a competitive football 
team week in and week out, the team 
'played to the best of their ability all 
the time.' admired statistician Caro- 
lyn Gawrysh. The close scores exem- 
plified the men's frank determina- 
tion. Time and time again, IBC Ea- 



gles had better stats for yards, passes, 
rushes and carries, yet their efforts 
didn't carry to the goal line quite 
enough. Losing every game that they 
played. Coach Young noted a lack of 
a "killer instinct" among the players. 



Tom While prepares to meet Elmhurst's de- 
fense (right). 

Left prepares to meet the right. The result — 
everyone goes nowhere (below). 

'Who says I ain't got personality?' grins Todd 
Nelmark (lower left). 





FOOTBALL TEAM, front: Doug Walent. 
Todd Petty, Victor Robbins, Gary Jakubowski, 
Tom Ruff. Rene James. Steve Smith, Tim 
O'Brien, Pat Keenen, Chris Stoming. second: 
Anthony Carter, Mark Vranicar. Steve Nickl, 
•John Reinert. Joe Possley. Ed McNally, Carl 
Vainisi, Sean O'Connor, Jim Novak, Tom 
Huffman, third: Tony Dorsett, Jeff 
McKendry, Joe Bauers, John Karpowicz, Jeff 
Bruns, Tom Cole, Daryl Jones, Brian Marsh, 
Randy Owens, Tom O'Connor, Tom White, 
Mike McKenna, Lenny Cyranek. fourth: Chris 
Cecil, Ed Gannon, Robert Vitale, Fred 
Schuttler, Frank Svacina, Tim Kogler, Bill 
Gannon. .Andy Pochos. Ray Praski, Mike Jen- 
kins, Mike Brzeczek, Jeff Henry, John Kura- 
tor, Joe Marley. fifth: Dan Fondern, John 
Wagner, Mike Spies. Dave Slinkman, Doug 
Mandru, Ken Hansen, Jack Golden, Jim Run- 
avich, Mike Cadman, Steve Camburn, Mark 
Laurich. Pat Pericht. sixth: Jim Tovell, Andy 
Sestak, Don Wagner, Joel 'Vearian, John 
Thome, Ralph Young, John Krebs, John Os- 
trowski, Joe Saunders, Marty Melin, Kathy 
Shea (right). 




46 Athletics 






■■•a* 




'■*V*'**!f' Vi.y< 



Carl Vainisi turns upfield for valuable yardage 
(upper left). 

Mark Laurich unleashes a pass under pressure 
from the defensive line (left). 

Steve Smith shows some side stepping (above). 



Football 47 



Spirit! 



Identifiable by their bright red and 
white uniforms, and enthusiastic cheer- 
ing and performances, the Cheerleaders 
and Pom Pon Squad keep the spirits of 
the fans at football and basketball games 
at a high fever pitch. Working long 
hours, these dedicated ladies perfected 
cheers and choreographed routines. 
Standing behind the IBC Eagles, even in 
the event of a loss, exemplified the spirit 
needed to promote winning teams. 





IBC Cheerleaders support the home team (top 
left). 

IBC CHEERLEADING SQUAD (top right). 

IBC Pom Pons go for the field goal (above). 

IBC POM PON SQUAD (right). 




48 Athletics 




I BC Cheerleaders arouse the crowd during the an- 
^-'r'*^''^. nual homecoming game (left). 

-... . .--__».^ ^ Pom Pon girl contemplates the game while 
':- ---"jSi awaiting her chance to perform (below). 




Cheerleaders/Pom Pon Squad 49 



Talented 
Dribblers 

Reaching for the stars while having 
both feet firmly planted on the 
ground, Coach Tony LaScala set win- 
ning goals for the season. A key point 
in our favor was the high level of tal- 
ent and potential on this year's team. 
'It is not very often when a coach can 
honestly say that all his players are 
varsity material.' pointed out Coach 
LaScala, but '1 can say that now.' 
However, deficient in experience and 
coaches, the Eagles lacked the needed 
intensity, motivation, and excitement 
— key ingredients in a consistently 
winning team — to capture the 
Northern Illinois Intercollegiate 
Conference (NIIC) title. Despite 
this, with the help of Most Valuable 
Player Quentin Davis, Best Defensive 
Awardee Jim Brooks, Most Improved 
Player Barry Bauer, and All-Confer- 
ence selection Mark Sinz, the Eagles 
flew to a fourth place NIIC finish. 

Quentin 'QD' Davis 'undos lor two' (right). 




MEN'S BASKETBALL TEAM, front; Jim 
Brooks, Paul LaScala, Eddie Singleton, sec- 
ond: Dan Sommers, Quentin Davis, Coach 
Tony LaScala, Mark DiGrazia, Tony Ivkovich. 
third: Trainer Timm Jayne, Iqbal Khan, Tom 
Kelly, Ted Popielewski, John Kelly, Trainer 
Jim Tovell. fourth: Dave Wijas, Barry Bauer, 
Tony Wygonski, Mark Sinz, Steve Dockery 
(right). 




50 Athletii 




Men's Basketball 51 



Winning 
Habit 

The three returning senior starters, 
NIIC All-Conference selection Rita 
Schulz, Marie Soltis, and Judy Yost, 
hoped not to kick their favorite habit; 
winning. In the past four years, these 
seniors have helped capture three 
Northern Illinois Intercollegiate 
Conference (NIIC) championships; 
this past year they came within one 
point of making it a clean sweep. Put- 
ting the loss into perspective. Coach 
Dave Swanson said, 'Athletes strive 
for excellence; they win in the striv- 
ing, not in the victory of defeat. The 
world loves a winner, but I love a trier. 
I have a team full of triers. These ath- 
letes are what IBC is all about.' 



Vicki Bartow battles under the boards as Marie 
Soltis looks on (right). 




52 Athletics 



Carol Nadolski works the ball inside for another bucket (left). 
Marie Soltis out-jumps her opponent for the ball (below). 





WOMEN'S BASKETBALL TEAM: front: 
Joyce Ryan, Jane Stalon, Carol Nadolski, Judy 
Yost, second: Laura Timoney, Lisa Rita Schultz. 
third: Marie Soltis, Coach Dave Swanson, 
Jackie Frederking (left). 



Women's Basketball 53 



Stroke . . . 
Stroke . . . 

6:00 A.M.: Splashing and shivering 
could be heard from the Rice Center 
pool as Jim Smith. Gerry Petit, and 
Randy Webster coached the team 
through their paces. Success was de- 
pendent upon such determination, ef- 
fort and teamwork. Early morning 
workouts preceded afternoon weight 
lifting sessions and yet more swim- 
ming. Double, sometimes triple, work- 
outs were mandatory on the annual 
trip to Fort Lauderdale, Florida (the 
land of sunshine, wide beaches, and 
southern hospitality). All the hard 
work paid off for the team: they fin- 
ished well in many invitationals, as 
well as earning second place at the 
Intercollegiate Championships and 
Private College Championships. 
Placing second at The Nationals, the 
team's Most Valuable Player, Steve 
Becker, became a three-time Ail- 
American in the 200-yard butterfl}. 
Chris West became an Ail-American 
in the 200-yard breaststroke. These 
individuals, as well as the 'unsung 
heros', stroked to a winning season. 



Every swimmer comes up for air now and then 
(right). 




OPPONENT 



IBC PLACEMENT 



Lake Forest College 

Hawk Relays 

N4idwest Invitational 

George Williams College 

North Central College 

Illinois Intercollegiate Championships 

North Central College 

Wheaton College 

Northern Illinois University 

Loyola University 

Augustana College 

Illinois Institute of Technology 

Private Colleges Championships 



John Marshall anticipates the start of another 
race (right). 




54 Athletics 





Carol Miller sucks in that precious oxygen 
during a grueling race (left). 

Steve Becker shows fine form in the breast 
stroke (below). 





SWIM TEAM, front: Mary Claire Keblusek, 
Colleen Coates, Mike Murray, Carol Miller, 
Manager Eileen Strevell; second: Coach Jim 
Smith. Mike Sheridan, Kurt Dedrick, Jerry 
Kilroy, Ray Tarkowski, Bernie McKay, Steve 
Becker, Assistant Coach Randy Webster; 
third: Tom Russell, Rob Stablein, John Mar- 
shall, Dan Flynn, Chris West (left). 



Swimming 55 



Spring Ball 

Warm spring weather signaled the 
beginning of the baseball season. The 
IBC baseball team took the tradition- 
al spring trip south to 'warm up' and 
begin their season. Much of the early 
season optimism was lost by inconsis- 
tent wins. The 'season was like a roller 
coaster ride; we were up and down in 
the way we played," noted pitcher 
Timm Jayne. Several 'come from be- 
hind' victories highlighted the season; 
Iggie Perez captured one victory as he 
hit a grand slam in the twelfth inning 
of one game, and John Karpowicz 
captured another with a three-run 
homer in a ninth inning. After one 
stunning victory. Coach 'O' ex- 
claimed 'The IBC Tradition is not 
dead!" Exemplifying the 'IBC Tradi- 
tion', Iggie Perez, leading hitter and 
Rookie of the Year, hit .357, the high- 
est batting average ever for an IBC 
freshman. Other outstanding players 
were: All-Conference and Most Valu- 
able Player Greg Kurcab; Best De- 
fensive Player Mike Frost; All Con- 
ference Ed Kolar; and Most Im- 
proved Don Johnson. In the end, the 
baseball team finished second in Con- 
ference. 





Poised and ready for action are third baseman 
John Karpowicz and shortstop 'Nacho' Perez 
(above). ; 

Surprising the opponents, the batter bunts the 
baseball (right). 

Pitcher Mike Bein readies to rip a strike past 
his baiting opponent (upper right). t 




^ h 



56 Athletics 




IBC 


OPPONENT 


OPP 


4 


Weslfieid State 


II 


3 


Vaidosta State 


6 


2 


Westfield State 


24 


4 


Vaidosta State 


13 


10 


Westfield State 


7 


1 


Vaidosta State 


12 


1-10 


Univ, West Florida 


5-8 


3-4 


Alabama Christian 


4-5 


0-7 


North Park 


5-5 


11-17 


North Central 


10-14 


9-4 


Elmhurst 


0-17 


2 


St. Francis 


12 


15 


Quincy 


9 


2 


McKendree 


13 


1 


St. Xavier 


17 


4-8 


Concordia 


3-0 


0-2 


Aurora College 


6-3 


7-3 


Rockford College 


8-2 


8-12 


Trinity 


2-4 


8-12 


Judson 


0-7 


5-3 


Olivet Nazarene 


2-4 


Don Sciackitano grins as IBC lakes 


the lead 


(upper 


left). 





I'll'' I' iilNiiiiiiin'iiyuiMMii m iwiiii i i iiiiiinii 'f I'liinn 



First baseman Ed Kolar is prepared to stop any 
ball that comes his way (upper right). 

'You're out!' cries the umpire as catcher Greg 
Kurcab thwarts an opponent's attempt to score 
(left). 




BASEBALL TEAM, front: Pat Nagle, Don 
Johnson, Joe Marley, Don Sciackitano, John 
Karpowicz, Ignacio 'Nacho' Perez, Mike 
Frost; second: student coach Mike Laurich, 
Greg Kurcab, Ed Kolar, Jim Garoutte, Ken 
Lavand, Timm Jayne, Scott Plaehn, Rich Best; 
third: Coach John 'O'Ostrowski, Jeff Krizic, 
Dennis Farina, Tom Kelly, Phil Langdon, Al 
Kern, John Wagner, Jim Miller, Coach Dave 
Swanson (left). 



Baseball 57 



A Threat 

The women's softball team completed 
another impressive season under the 
rigorous coaching of Deb DiMatteo. 
Since becoming the softball coach. 
DiMatteo has raised the team record 
each year, making IBC a threat to 
other team's standings. Appearing on 
the softball scene in 1981, and ad- 
vancing along with the team, Rita 
Schulz is probably one of the more 
valuable plasers on the team. In addi- 
tion to Schulz, pitchers Patti Russell 
and Laura Timoney, second baseman 
Sandy Ledvora, and first baseman 
Betsy Knox were most praise worthy. 








..^E^SSSSs; 



IBC offense slugs away at the defense (upper 
right). 

Reaching for the catch, Betsy Kno.x picks an- 
other opponent off first base (center right). 

With all her strength, Rita Schulz blasts away 
at yet another pitch (above). 

SOFTBALL TEAM, front: Linda Pullano. 
Anne Boddy, Sue Kowalski: second: Debbie 
Wagner, Jane Staten, Carol Nadolski, Patti 
Russell. Laura Martinek, Coach Deb DiMat- 
teo; third: .loyce Ryan, Sandy Ledvora, Laura 
Timoney, Rita Schulz, Betsy Knox (right). 







\ ^ 0wt^ (|j^ "^H^^ 




^y 


C^i'Wg ^ 




'# 
^ 

M 


^J^^W^^. 


'^I"^' ■ - ^cl ^^JWm 


it 







58 Athletics 




A close call at home plate (left). 

Laura Timoney release a fast ball (lower left). 

Rounding home after blasting the ball, Rita 
.Schul? is congratulated by teammate Laura 
Martinck (below). 



Prepared for the next hit, Sandy Ledvora con- 
centrates on the batter (lower right). 




li6|:l!i^WJ''':fj!i;l|:'i' ,. ■ 






iiL.-iiif' 



li'-iiiii^ii 





Softball 59 



More 

Active 

More 

Visible 

Bright new gold uniforms and a win- 
ter indoor schedule were the year's 
added assets to the team, making the 
club more year-round active and visi- 
ble. In the Fall, after several defeats. 
Coach Tibor Surin, and assistant Joe 
Suhayda, 'joined' the club, coaching 
the team to some victories. The busy 
practices taught technique, determi- 
nation, and the importance of team- 
work. Encouraged, the team hopes for 
an intercollegiate team next year. 





Miguel Palacios takes offense to the opponents 
aggression (upper right). 

An alert goalie is ready to meet any transgress- 
ing balls (center right). 

With precision, Mike Winkler prepares for the 
'kill' (above). 

SOCCER TEAM, front: Kevin Kavanaugh, 
Mark Klimek, Tom Gutchewsky, Al Nunez; 
second: Coach Tibor 'Tab' Surin, Al Carr, Ed 
Jurkovic, Joe Ozog, Mike Menolasino, Don 
Provenzale, Mike Winkler, Mark Peskor 
(right). 




60 Athletics 




Over Hill 
Over Dale 



Over hill and dale, through ihe mud 
and leaves ran our Harriers. Guided 
by coaches Bruce Coleman and Matt 
Igoe. the team ran to many strong 
finishes and impressive wins. The 
Rockford Invitational set the season 
pace as the Harriers placed second 
out of fifteen teams. In later meets, 
the team placed, at worst, third, with 
as many as twenty-two teams partici- 
pating. Individually, Jim Kavanagh, 
the team's Most Valuable runner, 
was IBC"s first All- American Cross 
Country runner, finishing twenty- 
fifth at a National Meet. The season 
ended with the Eagle Harriers domi- 
nating the Conference Champion- 
ship; nabbing the first five places and 
having eight runners in the top ten 
spots, they totaled a perfect score. 
The key to the successful season was, 
in part, according to Paul Marchese, 
due to the team having 'more depth 
than most teams.' '(Coach) Coleman 
is very much concerned with each 
runner ... he cares what happens to 
each person,' added Jim Kavanagh. 




Rounding the bend, Dan Tikusis sweats to 
maintain a lead (upper left). 

They've only just begun . . . (left). 



Soccer/Cross Country 61 



Forging 

Faithfully 

Forward 



Through rain, sleet, snow, and yes, 
sometimes sunshine, the IBC track 
and field team forged its way towards 
a very successful season. Led by head 
coach Bruce Coleman, and assisted 
by coaches Matt Igoe and Norbert 
'Nibbs" Scully, the devoted and en- 
thusiastic athletes endured long, tir- 
ing practices during a competitive 
season. The team finished well in the 
meets, usually placing second or third 
of fifteen or sixteen teams. Several 
individuals and a relay team qualified 
for the National Meets. Tom Huff- 
man, Anthony McCain, Quentin Da- 
vis, and Mike Olenek (in place of in- 
jured Stanley Evans) ran the 400-me- 
ter relay. Jim Socha qualified, and 
placed fifth, in the pole vault. Dave 
Toennies and Jim Kavanagh quali- 
fied for the 5000-meter run; Kavan- 
agh placed fifth. Overall, it was "a 
good season,' said satisfied Coach 
Coleman. 




George Trumbull bursts out off the blocks (up- 
per right). 

John Kurator gives his all in the shot put 
(right). 

Alex Ghanayem prepares to release another 
fine hammer throw (far right). 




62 Athletics 




Jerry Hinley glides upward over the high jump 
bar (left). 

Stan Evans steps effortlessly out of the blocks 
enroute to one of his many victories (center 
left). 

Bob Tracy and Chris Cornille come out of the 
final turn enroute to a 1-2 finish in the 800m 
run (below). 





TRACK TEAM: front Artego Jaunes. second: 
Regina Murphy, John Kurator, Tom Huff- 
man, Brian Gallagher, Bill Rogers, John 
Hurky, Coach Norbert 'Nibbs' Scully, Juvenal 
Gomez, Coach Matt Igoe, Coach Bruce Cole- 
man, third: Jim Socha, Stan Evans, Bob Tracy, 
Quentin Davis, Jim Walsh, George Sehl, Jerry 
Hinley, Jim Crosson, Maurice Bell, Mike Mur- 
ray, Paul Marchese, Dan Logan, Daryl Porter, 
not pictured; Alex Ghanayem, George Trum- 
bull, Tony .McCain, Mike Olenek (left). 



Track 63 



Tennis 

Rebuilding 

Strong 

After losing key players, due to their 
graduation last year, the IBC Tennis 
Team found themselves in a year of 
transition. Throughout the season. 
Coach John Thome made match-by- 
match decisions of seed placements. 
With sophomore Mark Pell playing 
lop position much of the season, the 
Eagles started their rebuilding pro- 
cess. Despite struggling at the begin- 
ning of the season, they handled their 
own well, and finished with a respect- 
able record. 



Mark Pell warms up his forehand beforehand 
(upper left). 

With concentrated aim, Gary Givens smashes 
one back (upper right). 





Don Norton leaps to overhand return (above). 

Using a double-fisted backhand, Linda 
Tomsky defends her side of the court (right). 







64 Athletics 




■-^y»w« yl l^ w WJ l l ^ ll ^^ »* ^WW * \Wlft^ ^ yft l li^ ^w^^< ■ .■ 




In mid air, Tom Stoll bops one to the opposition 
(upper left). 

A long stretch, and the ball is returned (upper 
right). 

With deep concentration, Scott Soltis serves a 
ball (above). 

TENNIS TEAM, front: Coach John Thome, 
Tom Stoll, Don Norton, Mark Pell; second: 
Nicole Stanford, Scott Soltis, Linda Tomsky, 
Gary Givens (left). 



Tennis 65 



Organizations 









5585 V.05694 nlSf 

u 1011 Rnioi9 Pdio 



V$1902^^ri922 ^^Ptl< 



ACS Chapter President Tony Bell volunteered 
his time and talent to help complete a wall-size 
periodic table. 




LeadersLeadersLeadersLeadersLeadersLeadersLeadersLeadersLeadersLeadersLeadersLeadersLeadersLeadersLeadersLeadersLeadersLeaders 



1983-84 Student Leaders 



Student Affairs Board. Executive President 

Student Affairs Board, Executive Vice-President 

Student Affairs Board, Executive Secretary 

Student Affairs Board, Executive Business Manager 

Student Affairs Board, Executive Promotional Manager 

Senior Class President 

Junior Class President 

Sophomore Class President 

Freshmen Class President 

Residence Hall Association. Executive President 

Residence Hall Association, Executive Vice-President 

Residence Hall Association, Executive Secretary 

Residence Hall Association, Executive Treasurer 

Jaeger Hall President 

Kohlbeck Hall President 

Neuzil Hall President 

Ondrak Hall President 

American Chemical Society 

Blue Key National Honor Society 

Business Club 

CANDOR, Editor 

Circle K 

Collegium DeMusicalis 

Commuter Association 

Computer Science 

IBC Astronomical Society 

International Relations Society 

Jugglers Club 

LeCerce Francais 

Math Club 

Medical Tech. Club 

Nurses Club 

Pep Band 

Philosophy Club 

Physics Club 

Political Science Club 

Sociedad de Cultura Hispanica 

Theatre Guild 

Tri-Beta 

Union of Minority Students 

Yearbook, Editor 



Don Provenzale 

Rich Steslow 

Peggy Fitzgerald 

Terry Martinka 

John Marshall 

Marci Svec 

Maureen Pencak 

Patty Donnelly 

Thomas Murray 

Todd Nelmark 

Larry Ubl 

Bob Mosley 

Joseph Possley 

Brian Brieske 

Jim Glimco 

James Fahey 

Donna Kliver 

Tony Bell 

Alex Ghanayem 

Terry Martinka 

Kathy Lillig 

Steve Staniszewski 

Anne Thompson 

Donna Pytlik 

Mike DeLorey 

Mike Kavanaugh 

Mary Casey 

Carl Molyneaux 

Frank Cioffoletti 

Steve Becker 

Lori LaMotte 

Domenica Marsala 

Tony Bell 

Bridget Gruzdis 

Tom Nesnidal 

Denise Mamen 

Al Nunez 

Frank O'Brien 

Joe Stella 

Marlon Mitchell 

Cathie Stein 



Leaders LeadersLeadersLeadersLeadersLeadersLeadersLeadersLeadersLeaders Leaders LeadersLeadersLeadersLeadersLeadersLeadersLeaders 



Organizations 



Student AffairsBoardSludenlAITairsBoarclSludenlAfrairsBoardStudcnlAfrairsBoardStudenlArfairsBoardSludemAffairsBoardStudentAffairsBoard 



Student Affairs Board 



The Student Affairs Board, a repre- 
sentative body elected annually from 
within the student body, acts in the 
interest of the students. The Student 
Affairs Board promotes the general 
welfare of the student, acts as a unify- 
ing factor for the student voice, pro- 
vides a means whereby students may 
engage in the decision-making pro- 
cesses of the College, and recom- 



mends policies on College life to the 
appropriate authority. It provides 
students with the opportunity to par- 
ticipate in all phases of leadership and 
to learn through experience the tech- 
niques and responsibilities of demo- 
cratic action. The Student Affairs 
Board is responsible for the annual 
allocation of the student activities fee, 
and monitors all activities in which 



these fees arc utilized. Some of the 
best attended activities included the 
Homecoming Dance, the Halloween 
Dance, The Rocky Horror Picture 
Show, a performance given by Big 
Twist and the Mellow Fellows, and 
the Senior Ball. 

EXECUTIVE BOARD. Don Provenzale, Peg- 
gy Fitzgerald, Terry Marlinka. Rich Steslow, 
John Marshall (below). 




Student AffairsBoardStudentAffairsBoardSludentAffairsBoardStudentAffairsBoardStudenlAffairsBoardStudentAffairsBoardStudentAffairsBoard 



Leaders/SAB 69 



Student AffairsBoardSludemAffairsBoardStudentAffairsBoardStudenlAffairsBoardSludeniAffairsBoardSludcntAffairsBoardSludentAffairsBoard 




Student AffairsBoardStudent Affairs BoardStudenlAffairsBoardStudentAffairsBoardStudenlAITairsBoardStudentAffairsBoardSludentArfairsBoard 



70 Organizations 



Student AffairsBoardStudentAffairsBoardStudentAffairsBoardStudent Affairs BoardSludenl Affairs BoardSludentAffairsBoardStudcnlAffairsBoard 




SENIOR CLASS BOARD, front row: Olga Garnica, Connie Putz. 
Marci Svec. second row: Jim Soclia, Bob Tracy. Mike Kavanaugh 
(far upper left). 

JUNIOR CLASS BOARD, front row: Tom Ruff, Frank O'Bnen. Dan 
Stoops. Second row: Annette Markun. Vicky Plys. Maureen Pencak (far 
lower left). 

SOPHOMORE CLASS BOARD. Cindy Cahill. Maureen Stucvcr. 
Palti Donnelly (below). 

FRESHMEN CLASS BOARD, bottom: Thomas Murray, middle: 
Scott Plaehn. top: Robert Ching (left). 




Student AffairsBoardStudentAffairsBoardStudentAffairsBoardStudentAffairsBoardStudenlAffairsBoardStudent A ffairsBoardStudentAffairsBoard 



SAB 7! 



ResldeIK■eHallA^^oclallonRo^ldenceHallA^^lX'latlo^Rc^ldenccHallAs^ociallonResldLMlceHallAssoclallonRosldenccHallAs^c)clallonRe^idelK■cHall 




NEUZIL HALL ASSOCIATION, front: Tom 
O'Connor, second: Wayne Dendler. Jerry Kil- 
roy. Beth Ward, Jim Fahey. Michelle Halm. 
Ken Hansen, Jacqui Morris (above). 

ONDRAK HALL ASSOCIATION, front 
Magda Limberis, Kathy Farrell, Laura Cusack, 
Mary Coler. second: Barb Kolich, Jeanne 
Manning, Sandy Kozubowski, Maureen Stu- 
ever, Ginny Olson. Corinne Danhauer. third: 
Judy Tudisco, Beth Eckman, Judy Jankowski 
(right). 




ResidcnLcHallAssocialKinRcsidenceHall.'Kssociation ResidenceHallAssociationResidenceHallAssociationRcsidenccHall.'^ssociateResidenceHall 



72 Organizations 



RosldcnccHullA^^^)clationRosidcnccHullAss(lCKlll()llRL■^ldL■llCl.'HullA^scl(.■latlllllRc^l(Jl.•ncoHullA^^oclall^)nResl^JcnL■cHallAs!.oclationResldenceHall 




Residence Hall 
Association 

Acting as government of residence 
life, the Residence Hall Association 
makes dorm living more orderly and 
pleasant. Through its Executive 
Board, Residence Hall Council and 
individual Hall Councils, the Associ- 
ation provides for student involve- 
ment in the formation of residence 
life policy, programming and plan- 
ning. The Residence Hall Association 
is also involved in the planning of so- 
cial and recreational events during 
the semesters. Major events of the 
year included: Mother/Daughter 
Brunch, Sadie Hawkins Dance, Mid- 
night Breakfast, Ondrak Fox Hunt, 
Pajamas Party, Sweethearts Bash, 
and Father/Daughter Dance. 

EXECUTIVE BOARD HALL ASSOCIA- 
TION, front: Larry Ubl. second: Bob Mosley, 
Joe Pcssley, Todd Nelmark (upper left). 

JAEGER HALL ASSOCIATION, front: 
Steve Dockery, Tom Russell, Paul Kozal. sec- 
ond: Brian Brieske. Bernie McKay, Nick Ku- 
gia, Mark Miklosz, Pat Pericht (lower left). 



ResidcnceHullAssoLiationRcsidcnceHall Association RcsidcnccHail.AssociationRcsidenceHallAssocialKinResidcncL-Hali.AssociationResidenceHal! 



Residence Hall Association 73 



CampusMinistryCampusMinistryCampusMinistryCampusMinistryCampusMinistryCampusMinistryCarnpusMinislryCampusMinistryCampus 



Ministry 



The Campus Ministry Team estab- 
lished specifc goals for the Campus 
Ministry Center, with include Li- 
turgical worship in the campus com- 
munity. From the Center flow the 
ministries of assessing the values en- 
vironment of the campus, serving as 
advisors on issues dealing with the 
moral and spiritual atmosphere, in- 
creasing awareness on issues of peace 
and justice, and monitoring college 
policy implications regarding values. 
People are involved in ministry 
through be-a-buddy, senior citizens 
programs, 'fix-it', a Thanksgiving 
Drive, and a Christmas Party for 
needy children. On campus programs 
include retreats, rap sessions, bible 
study, and RENEW. The traveling 
musicians, Epiphiny, minister 
through their music. Kay Hethering- 
ton explained, 'Praise is what our 
group is all about — showing the 
power and praise of God.' Each sum- 
mer, some students go to Nazareth 
Farm, where they garden, build, and 
basically 'work their tails off.' to aid 
needy people. 




Epiphiny performs at the Baccalaureate Mass. 
front: Maria Stanglewicz, Sue McCarthy, Carl 
Molyneaux, Joe Barlow, Kay Hetherington; 
second: Frank Garland. Corinne Danhauer, 
Peggy Prehn, Barb Sweeney, Mary Gorman, 
Dave Szum. Mike Olenek, Diane Baime, 
Kathy Lillig; third: Paul Thompson, Robert 
Drdak. Tony Scialabba. Pam Becker, Jeanne 
Hnilicka, Mark Lee (upper right). 

Fr. Ralph gives a philosophical homily in the 
Chapel (above). 




One night I drearried T was walking along the beacli with the 
Lord. Scenes from my life flashed across the sky. In each I r^ 
ticed footprints iir the sand. Sometimes there were t^o sefs 
footprints; other times there was only one.\\ 



During tHe low periods of my life I could see only one set of foot- 
prints, so I said, 'You promised me. Lord, that you would walk 
with me always. Why, when I need,ed yoii the most, have^pu not 
been there for meT / / < >j j | j 1 f /|/ / j(i P 



The^liofd replied, The jtiines I 
•V. ,Aoptx>rif0,/rhy cMld, i^yhen^4 <<a^ried yqii./ ' ■ 



yotivhaye seen only one set o 



i^///m 



t 




CampusMinistryCampusMinistryCampusMinistryCampusMinistryCampusMinistryCampusMinistryCampusMinistryCampusMinistryCampus 



74 Organizations 



CampusMinislryCampusMinistryCampusMinistryCampusMinistryCampusMinislryCampusMinistryCarnpusMinistryCampusMinislryCampus 




Joe Coscino is 'hard at work' building a house 
(upper lell). 

The runners up for Mrs. Indiana are: first: 
Mary; second (tie): Sue McCarthy, Connie Ni- 
ckels: third: Leeann Labus; fourth: Mary Gor- 
man (center left). 

Dino Ruinoro flirtatiously kisses a goat, while 
Ho Sung Pak and Joe Coscino look on (center). 

With a hoe in her hand, Mary Gorman pre- 
pares to stab her friends who are keeping her 
from gardening (below). 




The Nazareth Farm Family: Dino Rumoro, 
Maureen Stuever, Joe Coscino, Mike Kava- 
naugh. Sue McCarthy. Connie Nickels, Ho 
Sung Pak. Mary, Brian, and Mary Gorman 
with her goats, (left). 

"Well kids, it's really been a tough day,' says 
Kay Hetherington (above). 



CampusMinistryCampusMinistryCampusMinistryCampusMinislryCampusMinistryCampusMinistryCampusMinistryCampusMinistryCampus 



Campus Ministry 75 



CandorCandorCandorCandorCandorCandorCandorCandorCandorCandorCandorCandorCandorCandorCandorCandorCandorCandorCandor 



CANDOR 

Newspaper Staff 

The CANDOR was published 
throughout the academic year. Stu- 
dents, on a volunteer basis, produced 
the campus newspaper hoping to 
learn about newspaper journalism, 
and inform the IBC community of 
campus and world events. Under the 
direction of editor Kathy Lillig, the 
CANDOR was redesigned, giving it a 
'new look." 

Todd King rapidly types a story to meet a dead- 
line (center). 

'Who says typefitling is easy,' queries Kelly 
Foster (upper right). 

Kathy Lillig, editor-in-chief, tries to spark en- 
thusiasm during a newspaper meeting (center 
right). 

CANDOR NEWSPAPER STAFF, front: Kelly 
Foster, Cathy Rausch, Jerry Brokamp; second: 
Bill Fleming, Todd King, Kathy Lillig, Terence 
Martinka: third: Ken Sommer (bottom). 





CandorCandorCandorCandorCandorCandorCandorCandorCandorCandorCandorCandorCandorCandorCandorCandorCandorCandorCandorCandor 



76 Organizations 



Yearbook Yearbook Yearbook YcarbookYearbook Yearbook Yearbook Yearbook Yearbook Yearbook Yearbook Yearbook Yearbook Yearbook Yearbook 



EAGLE Yearbook Staff 



Upholding the philosophy that a 
yearbook is more than just a picture 
book, the 1983-84 EAGLE yearbook 
staff set to work creating a history 
book of people, places, and events 
within the IBC community. Break- 
ing the mold, the book was rede- 
signed, and the amount of copy in- 
creased. EAGLE staff photographers 
lurked about campus snapping can- 



did pictures of unsuspecting students, 
faculty, and administration. We en- 
deavored to depict the striving, 
achieving, jovial, and tender mo- 
ments, the memory creating mo- 
ments, the Shining Memories. We 
created a book ... a story ... a jour- 
ney . . . your journey. Travel it often 
to a time now gone. 



Regina Murphy carefully crops the Socicdad 
De Cultura Hispanica picture (center left). 

Jeff Brambora, EAGLE Photography Editor, 
takes a picture of his best friend (center right). 

EAGLE YEARBOOK STAFF front: Jeff 
Brambora, Regina Murphy, Bill Wojcik, 
Frank Garland; second: Kathy Lillig, Terence 
Martinka, Eileen Strevell. Cathie Stein. Cathy 
Sliglianese (bottom). 




YearbookYearbookYearbookYearbookYearbookYearbookYearbookYearbook Yearbook YearbookYearbookYearbook Yearbook YearbookYearbook 



Candor/Yearbook 77 



SociedadDeCulturaHispanicaCommuterAssociationSociedadDeCulturaH.spanicaCommuterAssociationSociedadDeCulturaHispanicaCommuter 



'Spanish Club' 

To meet the demand of those interest- 
ed in the Spanish culture and history, 
the Sociedad de Cuitura Hispanica 
was organized. 

SOCIEDAD DE CULTURA HISPANICA 

(right). 

Commuter Assoc. 

CA masterminded some of the best 
attended events on campus. Among 
them were Las Vegas Nite. Variety 
and Hypnotist Shows, and Turnabout 
Dance. 

COMMUTER ASSOCIATION, front: 
Chuck Antonini, Donna Pytlik, Kathy 
Sweeney, Anita Overton; second; Karen, Ann 
Sweeney. Jeff Lux, Mary Farrington, Charles 
Ross, Todd King (below). 





SociedadDeCulturaHispanicaCommuterAssociati- 



onSociedadDeCulturaHispanicaCommuterAssociationSociedadDeCulluraHispanicaCommuter 



78 Organizations 



MalhClubPhysicsClubNursesClubMalhClubPhysicsClubNursesClubMathClubPhysicsClubMalhClubPhysicsClubNursesClubMalhClubPhysics 




Math Club 

The Math Club served as a means by 
which students with similar interests 
and career plans joined together. 
Sharing their expertise, the members 
tutored other students having diffi- 
culty. The club-sponsored activities 
included a trivia contest, and an op- 
portunity to send balloons to your fa- 
vorite airhead. 

MATH CLUB, front; Annette Markun, Mike 
Cooney, Mary Kiely; second: Dr. Phyllis Kit- 
lel, Steve Becker, Joanne Connolly, Tim, Mi- 
chelle Szum. Mr. 'Milo' Meehan (left). 

Physics Club 

Continuing the study and propaga- 
tion of the field of Physics, are the 
Physics Club members. Spreading 
knowledge through tutoring, and 
gaining insight through hard work 
and guest lecturers, the future Ein- 
steins developed their expertise. 
Sponsoring several events, the Phys- 
ics Club remained an active organiza- 
tion. 

PHYSICS CLUB, front: Darlene Swyndroski, 
Jeff Novak, Mary Jirka; second: Tom Nesni- 
dal, Jeff Medland, Rich Usselman, Dr. Bowe 
(left). 

Nurses Club 

Upholding the philosophy that health 
is an integral component of one's life, 
and that the individual has a right to 
participate in the health care process 
and decisions, the Nursing Club was 
founded. The 'nursing practice simul- 
taneously incorporates the rules of 
care giver, educator, leader, and ad- 
vocate,' explained Domenica Marsala, 
R.N. 

NURSES CLUB. Joan Linden Jacqueline Far- 
naus. Pat McShane, Pamela Lmdenmeyer, 
Sherrie Corso, Mary Grdinic. Pamela Meek, 
Patricia Huie, Aruna Patel, Rosanne Mclner- 
ney (left). 



MathClubPhysicsClubNursesClubMathClubPhysicsClubNursesClubMathClubPhysicsClubMathClubPhysicsClubNursesClubMathClubPhysics 



Clubs 79 



AmericanChemicalSocietyAmericanChemicalSocietyAmericanChemicalSocietyAmericanChemicalSocietyAmericanChemicalSocietyAmerJcan 



American Chemical Society 



IBC'S chapter of the American 
Chemical Society is the largest sci- 
ence club on campus, offering mem- 



Periodically, Joe Hcnnessy does some work 
(center). 

Using one of Julia's recipes. Chef Tony Bell 
serves unsuspecting victims during the ACS 
picnic (right). 

AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY, front: 

secretary Shiela Czapski, secretary JoAnne 
Connolly, advisor Dr. Richard Hyslop, vice- 
president Joe Hennessy, president Tony Bell, 
treasurer Alex Ghanayem, historian Mike 
Martirano; second: Mary Wong, Steve Pala- 
tinus, Vikki Vlastnik. Laura Mraz. Carolyn 
Gawrysh, Cindy Gorski, Bob Perlovvski; third: 
Joe Coscino, Mike Menolasino, Mary Jirka, 
Jeanne Hnilicka, Scott Plaehn, Dino Rumoro, 
Frank O'Brien, Phil Montefalco; fourth: Patri- 
cia Carroll, Rosann Ross, Diane DiPietro, Bob 
Ching, Melissa Trok, Lisa Airan, Lisa Yeh, 
John Nicholas, Tom Ruff: fifth: Nejat Destani, 
Pete Kakavas, Veronica Toth, Kevin Kassay, 
Tony Fracaro, Ed Johnson, Mark Jablonski, 
Larry LaLonde, Cathy; sixth: Rich Bychowski, 
Jeff Brambora (bottom). 



bership to those interested in the 
chemical, biochernical, anci nutrition- 
al sciences. The chapter was recog- 
nized as outstanding, for the 15th 
time in the past 16 years. Beginning 
the year with a picnic and a softball 
game, the active club offered trips to 
Miller Brewery in Milwaukee and 



Lynfred Winery in Roselle, and 
speakers to those interested in career 
alternatives and chemical 'magic'. 
The members completed the periodic 
table in S-139, and sponsored fun- 
draisers, such as selling coupon books 
and throwing pies at your favorite 
teacher. 





Americap.ChemicalSocietyAmcricanChemicalSocietyAmericanChemicalSociety.-\mericanChemicalSocietyAmericanChemicalSocietyAmerican 



80 Organizations 



riBetaTriBetaTriBetaTriBetaTriBetaTriBetaTriBetaTriBetaTriBetaTriBetaTriBelaTriBetaTriBetaTriBetaTriBetaTriBetaTriBetaTriBetaTri 




members for the future. Speak- 
ers from all areas of the biologi- 
cal field lectured on topics from 
the "Chemistry of Sleep" to 
'How to Apply to Medical 



Tri-Beta 

A main purpose of Tri-Beta, a School.' Club-sponsored activi- 
biology club, was to prepare its ties included touring a dental 



school, a trip to Brookfield Zoo, 
Halloween pumpkin sale, fruit 
sale, booksale, and serving as a 
tour guide in the Jurica Muse- 
um. 



Joe Stella tries to offer candy to little 
l\ids during a Jurica Museum tour (left). 

Pani Nolan sells pumpkins durmg one 
of Tri-Beta's fund-raismg events (cen- 
ter). 

TRI-BETA. front: Joe Stella, Jeanne 
Cronborg, Gary Harvey, Mary Farrell, 
Michelle Dixon, Chris Calzaretta, 
Mike Kavanaugh, Pete Kakavas; sec- 
ond: Gary .^nnunziata, Ron Stella, Pete 
Dragisic, Bruce Kuesis, Nejat Destani, 
Leeann Labus, Bill Caron, Kevin Dono- 
van, Sue Rozner. Leslie Damiofal. Rich 
Rupkalvis, Iqbal Khan. Bob (bottom). 




TriBetaTriBetaTriBetaTriBetaTriBetaTriBetaTriBetaTriBetaTriBetaTriBetaTriBetaTriBetaTriBetaTriBetaTriBetaTriBetaTriBetaTriBetaTri 



Clubs 81 



JugglersClubFencingJugglersClubFencingJugglersClubFencingJugglersClubFencingJugglersClubFencingJugglersClubFencingJugglersClub 



Fencing 



Fencing is the art of attack and de- 
fense with a sword or foil. Interested 
students were organized by student 
coach Jeff Brambora to learn the dif- 
ficult, but enjoyable performing art. 

FENCING, front: Rcgina Murphy, Cathie 
Stein, Jeff Brambora; second: Frank Garland, 
Rich Rupkalvis (right). 

Jugglers Club 

Formed this past year, the .Jugglers 
Club met the demand of many inter- 
ested in the performing arts. Mem- 
bership was open, not only to those 
who juggle, but also to those who had 
a desire to learn juggling or other cir- 
cus arts. 




An,\iously watching as the blade .slices the air. 
Rich Rupkalvis carefully juggles (above). 

JUGGLERS CLUB, front: Donna Herlihey, 
Mike Martirano, Mark Klimek; second: Tim, 
Rich Rupkalvis, Carl Molyneaux. Phil Monte- 
falco (right). 




JugglersClubFencingJugglersClubFencingJugglersClubFencingJugglersClubFencing.lugglersClubFencingJugglersClubFencingJugglersClub 



32 Organizations 



CollegiumDeMusicalisPepBandCollegiumDeMusicalisPepBandCollegiumDeMusicalisPcpBandCollegiumDeMusicalisPcpBandCollcgiu 





^ 



^^ 



^ 



J^ 



^"t^^ 



e 



^i- 



¥ 



^ 



m 



~A 




Pep Band 



The Pep Band was a familiar sight at 
home football and basketball games. 
Led b> Tony Bell, the band aroused 
the home team fans to spirited cheer- 
ing. 

PEP BAND, from: Tony Bell, Lore Surdich, 
Sieve GrobI, Marty Bell, Paul Toussaint; sec- 
ond: Kevin Landers — Drums, Dana Soukal, 
Peggy Toussaint, Liz Bell, Joe Schlesinger, 
Phil Spokas (upper left). 

Collegium 
DeMusicalis 

Expression through song, and learn- 
ing the aesthetic value of music were 
key pleasures of the talented club 
members. 

COLLEGIUM DEMUSICALIS. front: Mark 
Lee, Sandy Edgett, Voraporn Wanadit, Diane 
Baime, Kathy Lillig, Pamela Becker, Bill 
Wilder, Tony Scialabba; second: Anne Thomp- 
son, Robert Drdak, Stephanie Boesso, Joe Bar- 
low, Paul Thompson (below). 



EK^WW>F>.'^:«M*»^»r.v 




CollegiumDeMusicalisPepBandCollegiumDeMusicalisPepBandCollegiumDeMusicalisPepBandCollegiumDeMusicalisPepBandCollegium 



Clubs 83 



BusinessClublnlernalionalRelationsSocietyBusinessClublnternationalRelationsSocietyBusinessClublnternationalRelationsSocietyBusinessClub 



Business Club 



A main objective of the Business Club 
was to enable students to develop a 
realistic view of the business world. 
Speakers from different areas of busi- 
ness aided students in their choice of 
concentration. Fundraisers, such as 
Dial-A-Donut, provided members 
with 'guinea pigs" for their lastest 
sales pitch. The major Business Club 



sponsored event was the Student/ 
Faculty Basketball Game, master- 
minded b\ club treasurer Terence 
.Vlartinka. 

One hungry student peeks into the bo.\es dur- 
ing Dial-A-Donut fundraiser (center left). 

BUSINESS CLUB, front: Marianne Hedin. 
Terence Martinka, Michele Rodzak; second: 
Mary Bonczyk, Frank Wedig, Cathy Lisy, Ag- 
nes Brennan, Linda Pullano, Mr, Gerald Via- 
tor (bottom). 



International 
Relations Society 

The world in which we live has be- 
come increasingly more complex. 
One must possess adequate knowl- 
edge to effectively perform in the area 
of relations. The members of the In- 
ternational Relations Society try to in- 
crease their awareness of their environ- 
ment, and the complex business and 
economic structure. 

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS SOCIETY 
(center ris;ht)- 




BusinessClublnternationalRelationsSocietyBusinessCIublnternationalRelationsSocietvBusinessClublnlernationalRelationsSocietvBusinessClub 



84 Organizations 



Friday AflernoonClubFriday A fternoonClubFridayAfternoonClubFridayAfternoonClubFridayAricrnoonClubFriday After noonClub Friday After 




Friday Afternoon 
Club 

One of the most exclusive clubs on 
campus, the Friday Afternoon Club 
(FAC) had a rather shaky existence 
this past year. The 'club', open to all 
21 years and older, had the philos- 
ophy of eat (popcorn), drink (beer or 
wine), and be merry. Those in atten- 
dance did just that. 



Gathered together to indulge in the evils of 
demon alcohol were Phil Bebar, Dan Brennan, 
Carl Vainisi, Mike Cooney, Bob Mosley, and 
Joe Saunders (upper left). 

A toast to good fellowship: 'The Frenchman 
loves his native wine; the German loves his 
beer; the Englishman loves his 'alf and 'alf, 
because it brings good cheer. The Irishman 
loves his 'whiskey straight,' because it gives 
him dizziness. The American has no choice at 
all, so he drinks the whole damned business.' A 
toast is made by friends, front; Tom Russell, 
.Ann Sweeney, John Marshall; back; Bill Woj- 
cik, Nancy Bonczyk, Eileen Strevell, Donna 
Herlihev. and Linda Johnson (center left). 




At the 'commuter table', students gather for a 
round, or two. or three, of beer (lower left). 

'Now students," instructs Eileen Strevell, 'this 
is a beer. You are supposed to drink it' (above). 



FridayAfternoonClubFridayAfternoonClubFridayAfternoonClubFridayAfternoonClubFridayAfternoonClubFriday.AfternoonClubFridayAfter 



Clubs 85 



Fun 'n 
Games? 

While incoming freshmen became 
anxious, and a sense of foreboding 
doom overcame the rest of us. the 
residence life staff was busy with "fun 
"n games". Attending an orientation in 
August at Lake Blackwell, R.A.s 
learned the proper techniques in 
write-ups, attended seminars con- 
cerning topics such as alcohol aware- 
ness, and learned the rules and regu- 
lations. Small group sessions enabled 
them to learn more of each other and 
build a stronger team of R.A.s. 




Chef Sue Czerwinski prepares Ruffles for din- 
ner (above). 

'Okay girls, now there has to be a pole around 
here somewhere" (upper right). 

Time for relaxation! (center right). 

Parked on a bench, voila the residence lite 
staff: front; Karen Lee, Nancy Westenberger, 
Jaime Escobedo, Sue Czerwinski; second: 
Cindy Chase, Marcia Menke, Mike Allen. Mike 
Buck, Terry Ensign, Phil Montefaico; third: 
Jeff Henry, Todd Nelmark, Phil Moore. Bill 
Wojcik, Jeff Medland. Larry Bettag (right). 




Events 




Transitions 

To help ease the incoming freshmen 
through a sometimes disquieting 
transition, returning students and the 
residence Hfe staff help to orientate 
them. Small group discussions teach 
about academic advising, alcohol 
awareness, the health service, and 
where the finance office is. Social 
events, such as movies, picnics, ice 
cream social, and knee-slapping 
square dance aid to acquaint the stu- 
dents. 



I ynn Rossi and Mary Billings give each other a 
pat on the back for the fine orientation jobs 
(upper left). 

'I am such a helpful R.A.,' sighs Nancy Wes- 
lenbcrger (upper center). 

Smiling, Rich Steslow, Larry Bettag, and Peg- 
gy Fitzgerald enjoy the Ice Cream Social (left). 




■Really, It's just ice cream . . . don't be atraid,' 
persist Vikki Vlastnik, Al Nunez, and Mari- 
anne Hedin (above). 

'Welcome, we are your friendly O.A.s who will 
initiate, I mean orientate, you": front; Steve 
Staniszewski, Karen Balzanlo, Diane Connol- 
ly, Trish Keporos, Mark Krudo, Vikki Vlast- 
nik, Frank O'Brien; second; Al Nunez. Lori 
LaMotte, Victor Litwin. Marianne Hedin (left). 



Orientations 



Spirit 
Reigned On 

'Twas the week before Home- 
coming, all through the school 
The students were squirming, 
the teachers couldn't rule. 
The events were all planned 
by committees with care. 
In hopes that the student 
body would all be there. 
As it turned out the events 
were all a smash 
From leg auction to hypnotist 
to pep rally bash. 
All were restless 
in anticipation of the game. 
Hoping a win 

might bring the Eagles fame. 
Then what to our wondering 
eyes should appear — 
The fearless IBC Eagles 
all in football gear. 
More rapid than reindeers 
the Eagles all came. 
Cheerleaders rooted 
shouting each player's name. 
Out to the field 
the pla_\ers stampeded. 
With warm applause 
the fans greeted. 
Between all the raindrops 
an announcement was made. 
On to the field the Home- 
coming Court did wade. 
The glamorous couple elect 
was Ginny and Joe, 
They chuckled about the rain 
with a 'ho-ho-ho'. 
The Hotel Continental was 
reserved for us all 
On the evening of October 
22nd in early Fall. 
The mood was merry, 
the attire was chic. 
Wining, dining, and dancing 
culminated the week. 
The last ones leaving, 
swerving out of sight. 
Bellowed 'Happy Homecoming to 
all, and to all a good night!" 




Todd Petty (46) slips and slides in the mud for yardage at the game (top). 

Equipped with unibrella.s, raincoats and hats, IBC alumni faithfully came 'home' to attend the 
game with students (center). 

Making merry memories are front: Lynn Mizialko, Mike Sheridan. Ann O'Donncl. Tim O'Brien, 
Dan Flynn. Marcia, back: Bruce Kuesis, Lora Harty, Sean O'Connor, Nora Crosson (bottom). 



90 Events 




Todd Nelmark displays his affection toward 
Maria Cordon by a bear-sized hug (above). 

The Homecoming Court; Louise Vitaie, Bob 
Tracy, Julie Pudlo, John Reinert, Oiga Gamica, 
Larry Bettag. Queen Ginny Olson, King Joe 
Possley, Queen Emerita Tracy Stabiick, King 
Emeritus Mike Cooney, Marcia Menke, Mike 
Buck, Cathy Runavich, Tom Ruff (lop). 

In step with the music, Brian Brieske and 
friend glide across the dance floor (left). 



Homecoming 91 



The 
Haunting 

Deep into the night of October 31st, 
when the moon shone and the dogs 
howled, appeared creatures of all 
forms, from witches to ghosts to long- 
legged beasties, from cans to clowns 
to bagged ladies. Clustered together, 
all slinked to the Nest for a SAB 
Bash. They grooved to the tunes of 
D.J. Mike Murray, until they could 
no more. The creatures slurped alco- 
holic concoctions and cider, and de- 
voured popped corn, until they 
dropped to the floor, and crawled 
safely into hiding until the haunted 
eve next year. 



Residents gather together before getting 
dressed for the Halloween Party (upper right). 

Cavemen at IBC? 'Uug,' respond Jeff Bruns 
and Bruce Kuesis (far right). 

The moon has strange effects on: front: Joe 

Gura. Jim Myczek, and Jeff Gura (right). WfT 




Fashion conscious Laura Bernhard and Ginny 
Olson model their new waterproof (beer proof) 
bag gowns (above). 

A portable fan and green-skinned Hawaiian 
clones party together (right). 





92 Events 




Sadie 
Hawkins 



There comes a time each fall when all 
courageous young women must cast 
away their fear and anxiety, dry their 
sweaty palms, and clear their throats 
to ask a fateful question; these ladies 
ask the present man of their dreams 
to the Residence Life Association 
sponsored Sadie Hawkins Dance. The 
dance, held in a barn, proves to be a 
fun-filled evening of hayrides, spunky 
dancing and quenching one's thirst. 



Calhy Sliglianesc and Kevin Landers enjoy 
each other's company in seclusion (top). 

Snuggling, Bob Tracy and Mary Kay Farrell 
lr\ to keep warm on a cool night (left). 




Scan O'Connor and Nora Crosson swing to 
tunes (above). 

"Look at all the animals in this barn" remarks 
Cindy Knox to Steve Jerger (left). 



Halloween/Sadie Hawkins 93 



The Ball 

Smell the tantalizing aroma of the 
fine food . . . hear the sharp clicking 
of delicate wine glasses . . . dance to 
music . . . hear sudden bouts of laugh- 
ter .. . stroll in the moonlight . . . feel 
romance in the air ... envision the 
Senior Ball. The Ball, held November 
18 at the Hotel Baker in St. Charles 
was successfully organized, by the 
senior class, into a pompous black tie 
affair worth remembering. 




Caught in the act: Jeff Medland and Mary (top 
left). 

'My Pounchkin . . . ' mutters Tim Haas to Lin- 
da Johnson as he gives her a warm hug (above). 

Karen Scaletta and Fred Runge romantically 
gaze at the moon and the stars in the night sky 
(right). 




94 Events 




Taking a firm hold, James Bond prepares to 
sweep Olga Garnica off her feet (upper left). 

'Give it to me now.' hisses John Marshall to 
Ann Sweeney about the top hat (upper center). 

Marci Svec and George Trumbull capture the 
elegant atmosphere of the evening (upper 
riehl 



In the company of friends. Charles Franz, Peg- 
gy Whalen, Mike, and Sue Czerwinski enjoy 
the night air (left). 

"After you, dear,' Eileen Strevell politely says 
to Kevin Donovan (above). 



Senior Ball 95 



Challenge 
of Peace 



IBC welcomed one of its most distin- 
guished visitors February 8th, when 
Chicago's Archbishop Joseph Cardi- 
nal Bernadin made a long-scheduled 
visit to the campus. In an address fol- 
lowing his receipt of an honorary 
Doctor of Humane Letters degree. 
Cardinal Bernadin expounded many 
of the tenets contained in the recent 
May. 1983 pastoral letter, 'The Chal- 
lenge of Peace: God's Promise and 
Our Response,' the formation of 
which he directed. His main points 
centered around the reasons for bish- 
op involvement with the peace move- 
ment in the first place, the role of the 
church in a free society, and public 
opinion and its effect on policy. A 
crowd of 1,600 was in attendance to 
hear the Cardinal speak. 




Sister Benita spoke briefly about Cardinal Ber- 
nadin and the Church (upper right). 

Mary Gorman, backed by Epiphiny, sang for 
the Cardinal's visit (above). 

At a reception preceding the presentation. Car- 
dinal Bernadin meets Bob Moslev (right). 





96 Oraanizations 




Food for 
Thought 

Ah . . . food . . . glorious food! Food 
sustains us, gives us energy, and 
makes us fat. It can be an excuse for 
socializing, or an excuse not to study. 
The Midnight Breakfast, a Residence 
Hall Association tradition, serves all 
of these purposes. Occurring in the 
midst of finals, it is often the high- 
light, if not the only fun during exam 
week. 



Sneaking in to SAGA are Sue Rozner, Dave 
Szum, Paul Marchese, Joe Kirclnner, Olga 
Garnica, Julie Janecke, and Kevin Donovan 
(upper left). 

Terry Ensign, Ken Hansen, Todd Nelmark, 
Kay Hetherington, and Fr. Ted Suehy serve 
their creations to unsuspecting students (left). 

'Don't these people know that it is I 2:05 in the 
morning?' queries Bro. Finian Taylor (below). 




Off duly 'policemen' Mike Allen, Dave Lopez, 
and Mike Buck devour some chow (above). 

A possible victim of the Ondrak Syndrome. 
Diane Mena, asks friends Laura Cusack, Kathy 
Farrell, and Kathy Weber. Did 1 really eat all 
that much?' (left). 



Cardinal Bernadin/Midnight Breakfast 97 



Skiing 
IBC Style 

At 8:00, on a cold winter morning, over one hun- 
dred excited skiers packed themselves into three 
buses and headed for the slopes. After a tough 
day of skiing at Americana in Lake Geneva, Wis- 
consin, the troops headed for the main lounge for 
a night of drinking, dancing, and rock-n-roll. Re- 
ceiving 'royal" treatment, the famished skiers 
downed pepperoni pizza and five kegs of beer, 
rockinc to the latest tunes. 



'Whadya mean the skis go on my feet?' asks amazed Linda 
Pullano (right). 

Carol Miller and Cathy Lisy give brave smiles as they make 
their way toward the slopes (below). 




^ <S> 







Michelle Szum comes in for the slide (above). 

"Even without poles I ski better." jccrs Steve Becker as he 
sticks out his tongue (right). 




'■: ^ y;^my:r' 



^ 




98 Organizations 




Celebration 
of Talent 

One of the largest attended events on 
campus, the Fifth Annual Variety 
Show, held March 9, featured perfor- 
mances by members of the IBC com- 
munity. The 18 different acts includ- 
ed eight vocalists, an instrumental, a 
dance routine, three skits, a juggling 
duo, a magician, and an original video 
production. 'The Variety Show is a 
show of celebration for all — a cele- 
bration to enjoy each other's talents,' 
stated director Frank O'Brien. 



F.nicee Maureen Pencak, director Frank 
O'Brien, and emcee John Marshall joke as they 
introduce each other (upper left). 

The three 'Sons-of-Ares': Phil Montefaico; 
Dino Rumoro: and George Trumbull, and par- 
ty train conductor Alex Ghanayem, performed 
their choreographed dance routine, which in- 
volved break dancing (center left). 

Swiveling his hips, Terence Martinka performs 
an original number, 'I. B.C. Rock', sung to the 
music of 'Jailhouse Rock' by Elvis Presley (be- 
low). 




Phil Paul, Kathy Shea, Dave Szum, and Joann 
Reier perform 'You Got a Friend' by Carol 
King (left). 



Ski Trip/Variety Show 99 



Like 
Mother 

Like 
Daughter 

Like mother, like daughter, or so the 
old saying goes. Nurtured from 
youth, a mom and daughter create 
strong bonds. The daughter wants to 
grow up and be 'just like mommy"; 
more often than not, it happens. The 
RHA sponsored Mother/Daughter 
Brunch gave moms and daughters a 
chance to gossip, joke, laugh, and 
share hugs. Open to all female stu- 
dents and their mothers, the SAGA- 
catered Brunch was held in the Social 
Center. 



Nancy Pictor and her mother enjoy a stroll 
after brunch (upper right). 

"Hey mom. do you want to hear a good joke?' 
giggles Jeanne Hnilicka (center right). 

'Mom. you're the best.' admires Corinne Dan- 
hauer (below). 




'Hi Mom!' smile Javier Pujals and Don Sciack- 
itano, as they break from serving (above). 

Like Mother, Like Daughter; 'twins': Linda 
Brandi and her mother (right). 




100 Events 




Dad ... in 
Your Honor 

It is tough to be a good father of a 
young lady in this day and age; often 
there is not enough appreciation in 
exchange for all the gray hairs and 
worry. The Father/Daughter Dance, 
sponsored by Ondrak Hall, gave the 
ladies a chance to express their grati- 
tude by treating them to a night of 
wining, dining, and dancing in the So- 
cial Center. A dance contest chose the 
best boogiers. The evening strength- 
ened family ties, leaving each with a 
better appreciation of the other. 



In the best of company, each other, Cathy Slig- 
lianese and her father enjoy the evening togeth- 
er (upper left). 

By the size of their smiles, it is apparent that 
Jeanne Cronborg and her dad enjoyed their 
meal (center left). 




Mary Rose Vokurka and her father dance the 
two-step, a nice uncomplicated dance, to the 
Steve Grobl Orchestra (above). 

'My daughter, Laura, is good friends with this 
clown. Larry UbI?' asks Mr. Cusack in amuse- 
ment (left). 



Mother/Daughter Brunch/Father/Daughter Dance 101 



Honoring 
Our Best 

On May 3, IBC honored its most 
achieved students at an Honors Con- 
vocation. Awards were given to top 
students in each class and depart- 
mental division. The academic 
awards were given to graduating sen- 
ior students who demonstrated distin- 
guished achievement in their areas of 
concentration: Education Division — 
Rita Schulz: Humanities Division — 
Mary Jo Wenckus; Natural Science 
Division — Joseph Hennessy; and So- 
cial Science Division — Thomas Rus- 
sell. A Service Award was presented 
to senior John Marshall for outstand- 
ing contributions of time and effort to 
the College and fellow students. For 
outstanding contributions of time and 
effort to off-campus community ser- 
vice, senior Michael O'Connell was 
presented the Community Service 
Award. To senior Mary Casey, for 
demonstrating an outstanding ability 
in initiating and pursuing campus ac- 
tivities, a Leadership Award was pre- 
sented. The Procopian Award, the 
highest honor bestowed on a graduat- 
ing senior, embodying scholarship, 
leadership, and service on a consistent 
basis throughout the college career, 
was presented to Anthony Bell. Re- 
cipients of the President's Award 
were: Francis Agnoli, Diane Baime, 
Karen Balzanto, Francine Gadzala, 
Carolyn Gawrysh, Alexander Ghan- 
ayem, Marianne Hedin, Jeanne Hni- 
licka, Mark Jablonski, Betsy Knox, 
Lawrence LaLonde, Annette Mar- 
kun, Carol Nadolski, David Slink- 
man, Catherine Stiglianese, and Mi- 
chelle Szum. Scholarships were 
awarded to: Robert Stablein, Ian 
Zaenger, Joseph Hantsch, Michelle 
Szum, Francis Agnoli, Alexander 
Ghanayem, and Patrick Mulcahy. Re- 
cognition was given to the Wing- 
spread Scholars. 




102 Events 




Success isn't a result of spontaneous 
combustion. You must set yourself on 
fire. 

Arnold H. Glasow 

John Marshall (opposite, upper left). 

Rita Schulz (opposite, upper right). 

Mary Casey (opposite, center left). 

Michael O'Connell (opposite, center right). 

Dr. Becker awards Catherine Stiglianese (op- 
posite, lower left). 

Dr. Becker congratulates Alexander Ghan- 
ayem (opposite, lower right). 

Dr. Richard Becker commends achieved stu- 
dents at the Honors Convocation (top left). 

Joseph Hennessy (lop right). 

Thoma.s Russell (center right). 

Mary Jo Wenckus (center left). 

Anthony Bell (below). 




Honors Convocation 103 



The Class of 1987 began their freshman 
year. 

Venesa Williams is the first black wom- 
an to become Miss America. 

269 civilians died when a Soviet fighter 
shot down a Korean airliner from the 
Pacific sky. 

White Sox won in the Western Division 



Our 'World' 



Approximately 200 U.S. Marines died 
during a suicide attack to the U.S. Ma- 
rines headquarters in Beirut. 

Interior Secretary James Watt, a member 
of Ronald Reagan's cabinet, resigned 
after 'talking himself out of a job'. 

U.S. and Caribbean forces invaded 
Grenada to retrieve more than 600 
American medical students stranded on 
the island held by Cuban forces. 

ABC aired 'The Day After", a film de- 
picting a nuclear holocaust in America's 
heartland. 

A record number of couples (540) at- 
tended the 18th Educare Ball, raising 
over $100,000 in donations for IBC. 

The Cabbage Patch Kids were the most 
frantically sought after Christmas pres- 
ent. 

Champaign, but no roses as Illinois lost 
big in the Rose Bowl. 

Pamela Becker and Angelo Nardella, 
the first IBC students to attend Taiwan 
Benedictine College (TBC), claimed the 
exchange program debut a success. 

Television audiences said farewell to 
M*A*S*H. but hello to After-MASH. 

Miami, Florida beats Nebraska winning 
the Orange Bowl. 

Illinois passed a law legalizing fatal in- 
jections for capital punishment. 




104 News Events 



And Beyond 




A>*-*- 



M^ 



AT & T was offically dismantled. 

Top videos included: Michael Jackson's 
Billie Jean, Thriller, and Beat It; David 
Bowie's Let's Dance; Talking Heads' 
Burning Down the House; and Eddie 
Grant's Electric Avenue. 

Los Angeles Raiders mounted a 38-9 
victory over the Washington Redskins 
for the NFL Championship. 

The 'Death' of the Sun-Times brought 
Mike Royko to the Chicago Tribune. 

Two U.S. astronauts, Capt. Bruce 
McCandless and Lt. Col. Robert Stew- 
art, made the first space walk without a 
lifeline; each wore nitrogen gas-powered 
backpacks to maneuver. 

Andropov Brezhnev, the Soviet leader 
died; Konstantin Chernenko was his suc- 
cessor. 

President Reagan ordered U.S. Marines 
to leave Beirut for ships offshore. 

Poland's Communist regime banned the 
display of crucifixes in state-run schools. 

'Where's the beef?' asked feisty Clara 
Peller while contemplating a tiny Brand 
'X' burger. 

The U.S. conducted its first flight test of 
an unarmed cruise missle, attached to a 
B-52, over Canada. 

The IBC '84 phonarama program raised 
more than $80,900, a new record for 
IBC. 

Fashion trends included 'ripped' sweat 
shirts, short boots, striped jeans, stone- 
washed mid-calf length jeans, over-sized 
sweaters and shirts, and leather mini 
skirts and pants. 

After 22 years as Chicago's top clown, 
Bozo, Bob Bell, took his final bow. 

The class of 1984 graduated. 



News Events 105 




Incognito/ ^nn and Kathy Sweeney 
lurk around campj|s. 




People Make the Difference 




1 08 People 




Home is where the heart is 

I tried so many times and maybe I tried loo hard 
But it seems that I could never say enough 
So here's another song about how much I love you 
Because every time I'm with you I love you more 
and more 

They say that home is where the heart is 
and my friends my heart's always with you 
I can call you home and I can call you family 
I can call you when I'm down and feeling blue 

It's just that you're always there and always 
by my side. You let me know that you love me 
and that your love Hows from deep inside 

1 could write a thousand songs about the way 
that I feel, my love for you is like a diamond 
and each side shines as bright as the sun 

by Vince Barlow 
copyright 1981 



Smiling, Cathy Russell and Dave Mozwecz have a fantastic lime danc- 
ing at the Senior Ball (upper left). 

Lying in the field. Dan Tikusis and Carol Nadolski relax away from any 
school hustle and bustle (left). 

'Party at Hennes.sy's!' front: Jeff Brambora; second; Lon. Tony Bell. Frank 
O'Bnen. Phil MontefaJco, Kathy Przybyla, Joe Hennessy; third: Neiat's wife. 
Nejat Destani, Dave Szum. Dr. Hyslop, Kathy Kruzich. Mary Hannenian. 
Alex Ghanayem. Tom Ruff. Man Wong. Pat Cooney, Linda Tomsky. 
Joanne Connolly. Dr. Rausch (below). 




People 109 




Steve Becker, Cathy Lisy and Linda Pullano whoop it up aflci whooshing 
down the slopes (upper left) 

'We defy you to find sexier legs," dare Tom Willis, Rich Rupkalvis, Fred 
Runge, Mike O'Ryan, Keith Kehoe, John Marshall, and Dave Stec (upper 
right). 

After cooling off in the slough, Tom Murray receives a pay-off for services 
rendered (above). 

'It's great to have friends!' exclaim front: Sheila Czapski; second: Colleen 
Coates, Vicky Plys, Annette Markun, Cathy Stiglianese, Maureen Pencak, 
and Mary Kay Farrell (center right). 

Phil Montcfalco and Cindy Chase 'snuggle up' in Campus Ministry lounge 
(right). 




110 People 




'My P.J.s are nol funny,' persisted Chris Calzaretta (left). 

Frantically hand-paddlmg toward shore, the girls wonder if it wouldn't 
be easier to swim (eenler left). 

Big Brother is Watching You (center right). 

'Hi Mom!' bellow Frank Garland, Mike Kavanaugh, Jeff Brambora, 
John Kennedy, Dino Rumoro. Sue McCarthy, Vikki Vlastnik. and Jaime 
Escobcdo (bottom). 




People 1 1 1 



Educators 




112 People 



Administration 




DR. RICHARD 
BECKER 

President 



MS. BARBARA 
BERNHARD 

Vice President, 
Development Relations 



Wlio)}i, then, do I call educated? First, those who manage 
the circumstances which they encounter day by day and 
who possess a judgement which is accurate in meeting 
occasions as they arise and rarely miss the expedient 
course of action; next, those who are decent and honorable 
in their intercourse with all men, bearing easily and good- 
naturedly what is unpleasant or offensive in others, and 
being themselves as agreeable and reasonable to their 
associates as it is humanly possible to be; furthermore, 
those who hold their pleasures always under control and 
arc not unduly overcome by their misfortunes, bearing up 
under them bravely and in a manner worthy of our com- 
mon nature; finally, and most important of all, those who 
do not desert their true selves, but hold their ground stead- 
ftistly as wise and soberminded men, rejoicing no more in 
the good things which have come to them through chance 
than in those which through their own nature and intelli- 
gence are theirs since birth. 

Socrates 




MR. WALTER BLOCK 

Vice President, 
Institutional Resources 



DR. MARVIN 
CAMBURN 

Dean of Faculty and 
Instruction 



MR. GERALD 
CZERAK 

Director of Communications 
and Marketing 



MS. LAURA DAY 

Director of Financial Aid 




MR. THOMAS DYBA 

Executive Vice President 



DR. JOHN EBER 

Dean of Graduate and 
Continuini; Education 



MR. NORBERT 
FARNAUS 

Vice President, 
Administration 



SR. BENITA 
JASLRDA, OSB 

Convener. Campus Ministry 



Educators I 1 3 




MR. GAY VIIYAKAWA 

Director of Alumni 



MR. TOM RICH 

Director of .-\dniis.sions 





w 




^^^m^r^ 


n^^ 




\\ 


i 




h ^ 


J 


I^^^^^^^^^Kii/u '- -^^ -^^^^^^^^^^^^1 







MR. DAVID STRIKER MS. .lOANNE STOHS 




Registrar 



Director of Neuzil Ha 



I am not a teacher; 
only a fellow trav- 
eller of whom you 
asked the way. I 
pointed ahead — 

ahead of myself as 
well as of you. 

Bernard Shaw 




BRO. FIMAN 
TAYLOR. OSB 

Dean of Student Services 



Karen Lee and Grace .Mendez show their appreciation to Bro. Finian 
Taylor (top above). 

Ka\ Hetherington. CaroK n Gaw rysh, and Jake share a few laughs about 
life in Ondrak Hall (middle above). 

Bro. Richard .ludy enjoys the atypical quiet in Jaeger Hall (above). 



114 People 





:^^' 



r I 



I 



i ! 
II 



I 






'""'Sk^ 




Peddling merrily along, Bro. Sebastian Kulin delivers the mail (above) 



Humanities Division 




DR. LUZ ALVAREZ 

History and Languages 
Department 



DR. PHILIP BEAN 

History and Languages 
Department 



MS. BARBARA BRIEN 

Fine .Arts Department 



MS. ROSEMARY 
COLEMAN 

Literature and Communications 
Department 



Educators I 15 



A schoolmaster should have an atmosphere of awe, and walk wonderingly, as if he was amazed at being himself. 

Walter Bagehot 




MS. MARY 
HENGESBAUGH 

Music Department 



DR. PATRICIA 
FALSER 

Philcsophy Department 



FR. MICHAEL 
KOMECHAK, OSB 

Fine Arts Department 



MR. MARK LEE 

Music Department 




MS. ROSALIE 
LOEDING 

Music Department 



DR. JOHN O'BRIEN FR. JOHN PALMER, 



Literature and Communications 
Department 



CSV 

Music Department 



MS. CHARLOTTE 
PUPPEL 

Music Department 




DR. MARK STOHS 

Pliilosophy Department 



DR. MARK 
TOULOLSE 

Religious Studies Department 



DR. BERNARD 
TOUSSAINT 

Philosophy Department 



DR. GLORIA TYSL 

History and Languages 

Department 



116 People 






Education Division 




■Earth to Dr. Baker ... Come in Dr. Baker" (bottom.) MR. JOHN MR. DAVID 

OSTROWSKI SWANSON 

'Now. for the last time, this \s the hall,' instructs Coach Swanson (top). Physical Education Department Ph\sical Education Department 



Educators 117 



Social Science Division 




DR. JAMES 
CRISSMAN 

Sociology and Psychology 

Dep:trl nii^nt 



DR. CHRISTOPHER 
KORNAROS 

Political Science Department 




DR. ELEANORE 

RYAN 

Sociology and Psychology 
Department 

1 1 8 People 



MR. JOHN HUBENY 

Business and Economics 
Department 



DR. JAMES lACCINO 

Sociology and Psychology 
DepartmenI 



MR. JAMES JANA 

Sociology and Psychology 
Department 




DR. SOYON LEE 

Business and Economics 
Department 



MR. JEFFREY 
MADURA 

Business and Economics 
Department 



DR. MARGARETE 
ROTH 

Business and Economics 
Department 



Education makes a 
people easy to lead, 

but difficult to drive; 
easy to govern, but 

impossible to enslave. 

Lord Brougham 




DR. JOEL SETZEN 

Political Science Department 



DR. CAROLYN 
SWALLOW 

Sociology and Psychology 
Department 



Science Division 




MR. JOHN 
ABRAMSON 

Physics Department 



MS. DEBORAH 
ADRIAN 

Nursing Department 



DR. JOSEPH BOWE 

Pliysics Department 



DR. DUANE BUSS 

Physics Department 




A surprised Dr. Meeker gets caught in the act of eating at the courtyard 
picnic (above). 



DR. ROSE CARNEY 

IVIathematics Department 



MS. EILEEN CLARK 

Mathematics Department 




DR. JAMES HAZDRA 

Chemistry and Biochemistry 
Department 



DR. RICHARD 
HYSLOP 

Chemistry and Biochemistry 
Department 



PR. ANTHONY 
JACOB, OSB 

Mathematics Department 



DR. LAWRENCE 
KAMIN 

Biology Department 



Educators 1 1 9 




DR. ALFRED MARTIN DR. CLARA McMILLAN 

Biology Department Chemistry and Biochemistry 

Department 



During Homecoming week, students tossed pies to 



m 




^^ ^ 


%, f 


1 '^Sm 


f^^^'i 


N 1 


\^ m 




ikM 




MR. JAMES MEEHAN 

Mathematics Department 



DR. RALPH MEEKER DR. JOHN MICKUS 

Physics Department Biology Department 



DR. DAVID RAUSCH 

Chemistry and Biochemistry 
Department 



1 20 People 





FR. THEODORE 
SUCHY, OSB 

Biology Department 




iream favorite teachers: Dr. Hyslop, Dr. Mickus, Dr. Martin, and Dr. Winkler (above). 



FR. RICHARD SHONKA, 
OSB 

Mathematics Depanment 




DR. JOHN SPOKAS 

Physics Department 



FR. PAUL TSI 

Mathematics Department 



MS. BARBARA VICTOR 

Mathematics Depanment 



DR. WAYNE 
WESOLOWSKI 

Chemistry and Biochemistry 
Department 



Educators 121 



Seniors 




122 People 




LINDA BALICKI 

Elementary Education 



JOSEPH BARLOW 

Music Performance and Theory 



semoritis 

(se nyer I' tis) — Acute inflammation of a senior gradu- 
ating student, in which its onset is rapid and the course 
relatively short. The disease knows no gender, no race, no 
size; it affects all seniors. 

SYMPTOMS: painful to attend lectures; studying and 
examinations are a pain in the — ; feelings of light-headed- 
ness and anticipation; increased closeness among friends; 
interest in the job market and 'outside' world 

ETIOLOGY: impending graduation; overexposure to 
parties; excessive socialization with friends; reminiscing 
over past slough parties, intramurals, road trips, SAGA 
'delicacies", 'quarters". Senior Ball, Senior Roast, Bacca- 
laureate Mass 

TREATMENT: Graduation 




PHILIP BEBAR 

Biology 



STEVEN BECKER 

Computer Science, Mathematics 



ANTHONY BELL 

Biochemistry 



JEROME BETTAG 

Literature and Communications 




STEPHANIE BOESSO 

Music Performance and Theory 



NANCY BONCZYK 
Computer Science 



MICHELLE BONOMO DANIEL BRENNAN 

Business and Economics Computer Science 



Seniors 123 




SHIRLEY BROWN 

Mathematics 



JAMES BYRNE 

Psychology 



ERIC CAMBURN 

Sociology 



MARY CASEY 

International Business and 
Economics, Political Science 




DAVID CAVAZOS 

Biology 



DANIEL CERONE 

Business and Economics 




CYNTHIA CHASE 

Elementary Education 



JOANNE CONNOLLY MICHAEL COONEY 

Biochemistry Computer Science, Mathematics 



JAMES CROSSON 

Physical Education 



1 24 People 




SUSAN CZERWINSKI 
Biochemistry 



CHERYL DANEKAS 

Pliysical Education 



WAYNE DENDLER 

Physical Education 



JOAN DESITTER 

Sociology 



Soprano Anne Thompson sings beautifully at her Senior Recital (left). 

By surveying the geography of the slough, Peggy Prehn gathers statisti- 
cal information for her research project entitled 'Ecological Analysis of 
the Slough at Illinois Benedictine College' (below). 




MARY DURNIK 

Computer Science 



JOHN DUTKA 

Business and Economics 



Seniors 125 




CATHERINE DYBA 

Literature and Communications 



MARK EASON 

Political Science 



JAIME ESCOBEDO 

International Busmess 
and Economics 



JAMES FAHEY 

Psychology 




Kathy Przybyla attempts to finish all of her homework so she can go to a 
Biochemistry 'meeting' on Tuesday night (above). 



MARGARET 
FITZGERALD 

Literature and Communications 






JEAN FLECK 

Computer Science 



1 26 People 




Never tell a young person that anything cannot be done. 
God may have been waiting for somebody ignorant 
enough of the impossible to do that very thing. 



John Andrew Holmes 



Analyzing inlenselv. Rich Steslow tries to figure out just what is going on 
(lel'l). 

Even coffee could not keep Miguel Palacios awake while studying (be- 
low). 



DANIELE FLEISCHER 

Biology 



DANIEL FLYNN 

Sociology 





OLGA GARNICA 

Psychology 



ANITA GAUMOND ANNAMARIE GLYNN JOANNA GRABINSKI 



Elementary Education 



Elementary Education 



International Business and 
Economics 



Seniors 127 




BRIDGET GRUZDIS 

Business and Economics, 

Philosophy 



JEFFREY GURA 

Computer Science 



MARK GUTH 

Business and Economics 



PAUL HANAN 

Undeclared Science 




GARY HARVEY' 

Biology 




JOSEPH HENNESSY 

Biochemistry 





_ ...... 


— * 


1 


— - 








^^Ka^^ CM 


^ ^ 


K'' 1^ IIIIM 


M^' 






^^^^^^K^^L V "'^^^1 


fe ir^'l 




P 


c 


ii^ 


^^^^-11 


i' 


^^ 






E 


jS?^^ 


k^ 




^Wi 


4- ^* • ^ 


1 




^^^ 




1 




M 


' ^ 


H 




j 


♦ ^ 


1 


^ I 


^^R 


-• 


p... 


* * 










ipW^^^ '^M 








J 






1 


MMBBWp^'" 



'Hi kids. We're here.' proclaim Kathy Kru/ich and Cathie Stein (above). 



128 People 




DONNA HERLIHEY 

Biology 



ANN HRUSTEK 

Accounting 



JULIE JANECKE 

ElemenUiry Education 



MELINDA JARVIS 

Nutrition 




TIMOTHY JAYNE 

Physical Education 



MARY L^ NN JENKINS LINDA JOHNSON 



Business and Hcononiics 



Hcaltli Science 



MICHAEL KAVANAUGH 

Biolosv 




ELIZABETH KIRKLAND 

International Business 
and Economics 



CYNTHIA KNOX 

Accounting 



DANIEL KOWALZYK BRIAN KRAJEWSKI 

Biology Accounting 



Seniors 129 




JEFFREY KRIZIC 

Accounting 



MARIT LEE 

Elementary Education 



"9 



JOHN MARSHALL MICHAEL MCCURRIE 

Computer Science Biology 





MARY MCLAIN 

Business and Economics, 
Accounting 



KATHY MCLARTY 

Psychology 



JEFFREY MEDLAND 

Biology 



CATHLEEN MIKSCH 

Accounting, Computer Science 




CAROL MILLER 

Physical Education 



ROBERT MOSLEY 

Biology 



DAVID MOZWECZ 

Biology 



REGINA MURPHY 

Computer Science 



130 People 



■Att^i^ifiAAM 




SEAN O'CONNOR 
Business and Economics 



Seniors 131 




JOSEPH POSSLEY 

Business and Economics 



DONALD PROVENZALE 

Biology 



Worldly Brent Terry teaches Jeff Medland the fine art of tying a necktie 
while at the Homecoming Dance (above). 

Enjoying each other's company, Fred Runge and Karen Scaletta stroll 
hand-in-hand through the corridors of the science building (right). 




KATHLEEN PRZYBYLA 

Biochemistry 



JULIE PUDLO 

Business and Economics 



CONSTANCE PUTZ 

Business and Economics 



DEBORAH PYTLARZ 

Medical Technology, Health 
Science 



132 People 




. JOHN REINERT 

Political Science 



DAWN RINELLA 

Biology 



FREDERICK RUNGE 

Literature and Communications, 
Psychology 



THOMAS RUSSELL 

International Business and 
Economics 




BRENDAN RYAN 

Computer Science 



TRACEY SABLICK 

Literature and Communications 




KAREN SCALETTA 
Biology 



CHRISTINE SCHULZ 

Business and Economics 



MARY JO SCHWARZ 

Chemistry 



JAY SCHWEIKART 

Business and Economics, 
Accounting 



Seniors 133 




MICHAEL SHERIDAN ROBERT SKARBEK 



Business and Economics 



Business and Economics, 
Accounting 



LISA SLEZAK 

Elementary Education 



JAMES SOCHA 

Political Science 




MARIE SOLTIS 

Sociology 



CATHERINE STEIN 

Nutrition 



JOSEPH STELLA 

Biology 




RICHARD STESLOW ROSE STEVENSON 



Biocliemistry 



International Business and 
Economics 



EILEEN STREVELL 

Accounting 




134 People 




MARCIANNE SVEC 

Business and Economics 



ANN SWEENEY 

Psychology 



THOMAS SWANSTON 

Music Performance and 
Theory, Psychology 



BRENT TERRY 

Business and Economics 




J 



dp<n\MCE 



Cindy Chase gives one of her famous grms (above). 



PAUL THOMPSON 

Music 



Seniors 133 




ANN TIERNEY 

International Business 
and Economics 



LINDA TOMSKY 

Biochemistry 



ROBERT TRACY 

Business and Economics 



ANNMARIE TURK 

Elementary Education 




GREGORY VELLIGAN MARY VITALE 



Bioloav 



Business and Economics 



DONALD WAGNER MARGARET WHALEN 



Business and Economics 



Elementary Education 




THOMAS WIESER 

International Business 
and Economics 



DAVID WIJAS 

Computer Science 



WILLIAM WOJCIK 

Literature and 
Communications 



JUDY YOST 

Computer Science 



136 People 





During a reflective homily, Fr. Ted 
Such> brings us back in time (top). 

Sharing jokes, laughter and, naturally, 
beer, are Joe Possley, Mark McCurrie. 
Dave Wijas, and Bob Mosley at the 
reception following the Baccalaureate 
Mass (center). 

During what is one of the last shared 
events of the college career, Leeann La- 
bus and Jacqui Morris drink to the good 
times ahead (left). 



Looking 
Back 



The Baccalaureate Service i,s a shar- 
ing experience among students, facul- 
ty and staff. Concelebrated, the Eu- 
charistic liturgy allows an extended 
time for exchanging peace, and has a 
reflective homily. The Baccalaureate 
Service 'looks back' upon the past col- 
lege years; it reminisces past exper- 
iences. A small step back in time 
brings the senior to late August, 1980 
— the scene is the orientation of the 
class of 1 984, the new freshmen class, 
the lowlife on the totem pole. We be- 
gan our college career at IBC by shar- 
ing laughter with newly made friends. 
Classes began, and before we realized 
it, we slept through a logic exam, for- 
got to turn in algebra homework, and 
'llagged" an organic quiz. Finals came 
and went, but the beards, cases of On- 
drak Syndrome, and the pilfered red 
IBC pencils remained. We shared 
good times, dancing, and 'beverages' 
at the Homecoming, Sadie Hawkins, 
Winter Weekend, Turnabout, and 
Senior Ball dances. We devoured 
hundreds of pounds of popcorn, cases 
of caffeinated Coke, thousands of 
green M&Ms, too many pizzas from 
Munchies, and unknown quantities of 
kegs of beer. We enjoyed the 'live" 
musical performances by 'Big Twist 
and the Mellow Fellows' and Harry 
Chapin, and were honored by an ap- 
pearance by Cardinal Bernadin. We 
canoed in the slough during the 
Spring Picnic, had numerous barbe- 
ques, and had private pool parties in 
our 2-feet deep 'baby' pools. We dis- 
played our comradeship in varsity 
sports and intramurals, as well as our 
ability to sprain our ankles. We know 
of a time when FAC was held in the 
Pub, not the Eagle's Nest or the Stu- 
dent Center. We remember the 
laughter, the tears, the joys, and the 
fears that we shared . . . when we look 
back. 



Seniors/Baccalaureate Service 137 



We've Come A Long Way 



'lofrt he' 



oljgBft "springs, 
^^^^^^gdace, touch the dft 

^y with old, good^riends. 



m 



tevenson II 




138 People 



^am 




We've Only 
Just Begun 



From anxious freshmen, we've devel- 
oped into proud, confident, and capa- 
ble seniors. Down a sometimes diffi- 
cult, sometimes praiseworthy, path 
we developed, learned, grew, became. 
We learned dependence, indepen- 
dence, and responsibility. We re- 
ceived from the IBC community 
things that are of inestimable value: 
knowledge, friendship, support, and 
respect. IBC has become a part of us, 
as we have become a part of IBC. 
We've come a long way, but yet, on 
May 20, 1984, we realized that we've 
only just begun. 



With a smile on her face, Rose Stevenson pro- 
ceeds towards family, as Marie Soltis hugs a 
close friend (center left). 

Graduates proceed to the Rice Center to re- 
ceive evidence of their achievements: their di- 
ploma (upper left). 




Prior 10 the receipt of her diploma, Catherine 
Stein smiles as she realizes that she's finally 
made it (above). 

Believing that Graduation is a social event, 
Donna Herlihey, in her graduation gown, gath- 
ers with family and friends (left). 



Graduation 139 




It is now we say goodbye — good friends, 
yet now 

look with us 
to a day yet to be 

when we all look back 
to this time. 
Where our troubles seem so far away 
and our victories but dying embers 
Wrapped in the past ' 

we run to dig through boxes of old memories 
and find this book 
dust off its cover 
and turn its pages 

only to believe in yesterday . . . 




educator index 







Abramson, John 1 19 

Adrian, Deborah 119 *> 

Alvarez, Luz 78, 115^ 

Baker, James 117 ^ 

Bean, Philip 115 

Becker, Richard 102, 103, 113 

Berhard. Barbara 113^ 

Block, Walter 113 M 

Bowe, Joseph 79, 119im 

Brien, Barbara 115 ''^ 

Brooke. Mary 1 17 

Buss, Duane 1 19 

Butts, Emma 32 

Camburn. Marvin 113 

Carney, Rose 1 19 

Clark, Eileen 119 

Coleman, Bruce 61, 63 

Coleman, Rosemary 115 

Crissman, James 118 

Czerak, Gerald 1 1 3 

Day, Laura 1 13 

DiMatteo, Deb 44, 58 

Dyba, Thomas 1 13 

Eber, John 113 
''^ssils; Elliott. Katherine 117 

Ensign. Terry 40, 41, 88, 97 « ^ 

Farnaus, Norbert 113 f 

Pause r, Patricia U6 

Foresta. Len 44 
• Hazdra, James 119 »s-!# 

Hengesbaugh, Patricia 116 



Agnoh Francis 38, 92, 102 

Airan, Lisa 80 

Allen, MichaelU, 21, 22, 32, 39, 88, 97 

Annunziata, Gary 81 

Antonini, Charles 78 

Baime, Diane 74, 83, 102 

Balicki, Linda 123 

Balzanto, Karen 89, 102 ^' 

Barlow, Joseph 74, 83, 123 

Bartolotta, Brian 65 

Bartow, Vicki 52 <^ 

Bauer, Barry 50, 51 ^^ 

Bauers, Joe 46 

Bebar. Philip 85, 122, 131 

Becker, Pamela 74, 83, 104 

Becker, Steven 41, 54, 55, 68, 79, 85, 98, 1 10, 

122 
Bednarski, Ann Marie 37, 92 
Bein, Robert 56 -^^^~ 

Bell, Anthony 13, 28, 67, 68, 80, 83, 102, 

103, 109, 123 
Bell, Martin 83 
Bell, Maurice 63 
Bernhard, Laura 6, 92 
Best, Richard 57 



Hetherington, Kay 32, 74, 75, 97, 
^ Hubeny, John 118 

Hysiop, Richard 19, 22, 80, 109, 1 

laccino, James 118 ii^^.,, 

Igoe, Matt 61, 63 i>**s^;:: 

Jacob, Fr. Anthony 119 

Jana, James 1 18 

Jasurda, Sr. Benita 96, 113 

Judy, Bro. Richard 114 

Kamin, Lawrence 119 

Kittel, Phyllis 79, 120 
-r Komechak, Fr. Michael 116 
iKeporos, Trish 21, 89 
"Kornaros, Christopher 1 1 8 
I^Krema, James 120 

Kuhn, Bro. Sebastian 115 

LaScala, Anthony 50, 51, 117 

Lee, Mark 74, 83, 116?' ^^Ifesv: 

Lee, Soyon 118 

Loeding, Rosalie 1 1 6 

Madura, Jeffrey 1 1 8 

Martin, Alfred 120, 121 

McMillan, Clara 120 

Meehan, James 79, 120 ' 

I Meeker, Ralph 119, 120 

Mickus, John 120 

Miyakavva. Cay 114 ^s-''-" 

O'Brien, John 116 f 

Ostrowski, John 46, 57, 117"! | 

Palmer, Fr. John 116 

Petit, Gary 54 



114 
19, 



120 



1 



Puppel, Charlotte 116 
Rausch, David 26, 109, 120 
Rich, Tom 114 
Roth, Margarele 118 
Ryan, Eleanore 1 18 
Sarubbi, Mary 48 
Setzen, Joel 1 1 8 
Shonka, Fr. Richard 121 
Smith, Jim 54, 55 
Spokas, John 121 
Stohs, Joanne 32, 41, 114 
Stohs, Mark 32, 41, 116 
Striker, David 114 

Suchy, Fr. Theodore 39, 97, 121, 137 
Suhayda, Joe 60 
Surin, Tibor 60 
Swallow, Carolyn 118 
Swanson, David 52, 53, 57, 117 
Taylor, Bro. Finian 97, 114 
Thome, John 46, 65 
Toulouse, Mark 116 
Toussaint, Bernard 116 
Tovel, James 46, 50 ' njjss^^; 
Tsi, Fr. Paul 121 's^'^Kl 
Tysl, Gloria 116 
Viator, Gerald 84 
Victor, Barbara 121 
Webster, Randy 54, 55 
Wesolowski, Wayne 121 
,,Winkler, Edward 121 
Young, Ralph 46 




>^^^ 
^ 



1 



% 







Student index 



Bettag, Larry 21, 23, 32, 35, 88, 89, 91, 

Billings, Mary 37, 89 

Bitz, Cindi 37, 48, 49 

Boddy, Anne 41, 58 

Boesso, Stephanie 83, 123, 138 

Bonczyk, Mary 84 

Bonczyk, Nancy 25, 41, 85, 123 

Bonomo, Michelle 123 

Booth, Joseph 12 

Bourke, Jennie 22 

Bower, Lisa 39 

Brambora, Jeffrey 33, 80. 82, 77, 109, 1 
^ 144 
'Brandi, Linda 48, 49, 100 

Brennan, Agnes 84 

Brennan, Daniel 41, 85, 123 

Brieske, Brian 68, 72, 91 

Brokamp, Gerald 76 

Brooks. James 41, 50 

Brown, Shirley 124 

Bruns, Jeffrey 46, 92 

Brzeczek, Michael 46 

Buck, Michael 32, 39, 

Buckley, Margaret 44, 45 

Bychowski, Richard SO 



123 



11, 



f 






91, 97 



Byrne, James 124 " 

Cadman, Michael 46 

Cahill, Cynthia 71 

Calzaretta, Christine 37,81, 111 

Camburn, Eric 124 

Camburn, Steven 46 

Caron, William 81 

Carr, Alain 60 

Carroll, Patricia 80 

Carter, Anthony 46 

Casey, Mary 41, 68, 78, 102, 124, 131 

Casselman, John 41 

Cavazos, David 124 

Cecil, Christopher 46 

Cerone, Daniel 124 

Chase, Cynthia 32, 37, 88, 110, 124, 135 

Ching, Robert 33, 71, 80 

Cioffoletti, Michael 68 

Coates, Colleen 39, 55, 110 

Cole, Thomas 46 

Coler, Mary 72 

Conneen, Kathleen 44 

Connolly, Diane 18, 37, 89 

Connolly, JoAnne 41, 79, 80, 109, 124 

Cooney, Michael 41, 85, 79, 91, 124 



Cooney, Patrick 109 

Cordon, Maria 91 

Cornille, Christopher 63 

Corrigan, Lisa 22, 37 

Corso, Sherrie 79 

Coscino, Joseph 33, 75, 80 

Cottral, Amy 37 • 

Crivello, Melody 22 

Cronborg, Jeanne 41, 81, 101 

Crosson, James 41, 63, 124 

Crosson, Nora 90, 93 

Cummings, Catherine 27, 41 

Cusack, Laura 37, 72, 97, 101 

Cyranek, Leonard 46 

Czapski, Sheila 15, 41, 80, 110 

Czerwinski, Susan 41, 88, 95, 125 

Danekas, Cheryl 44, 1 25 

Danhauer, Corinne 21. 37, 72, 74. 100 

D'Appley, Maiy 38, 39 

Darmofal, Leslie 41,81 

Davis, Quentin 39, 43, 50, 63 

Dedrick, Curtis 55 

Delorey, Michael 68 

Dendler, Wayne 41, 72, 125 

Desitter, Joan 125 

Destani, Nejat 80, 81, 109 

DiGrazia, Mark 50 

Dillenburg, Thomas 33 

DiPietro, Diane 36, 37, 80 

Dix, Gerald 16 

Dixon, Michelle 81 

Dockery, Stephen 18, 35, 50, 51, 73 

Donnelly, Patricia 20. 68, 71 

Donovan, Kevin 41, 81, 95, 97 

Dorsett, Tony 46 

Dragisic, Peter 81 

Drdak, Robert 74, 83, 125 

Drozd, Colette 41, 125 

Durnik, Mary 125 

Dutka, John 1 25 

Dvorak, Elizabeth 15, 37 

Dyba, Catherine 126 

Eason, Mark 126 

Eckman, Mary 22, 37, 72 

Edgett, Sandra 83 

Escobedo, Jaime 32, 33, 

Evans, Stanley 63 

Fahey, James 41, 68, 72, 126 

Farina, Dennis 57 

Farnaus, Jacqueline 79 

Farrell, Kathleen 72, 97 

Farrell, Mary 37, 40, 41, 81, 93, 110, 126 

Farrington, Mary 78 

Feltes, Jessica 126 

Fitzgerald, Margaret 68, 69, 89, 126 

Fleck, Jean 44, 126 

Fleischer, Daniele 127 

Fleming, William 39, 76 

Flynn, Daniel 41, 55,90, 127 

Fondern, Daniel 46 

Foster, Kelly 76 

Fracaro, Anthony 80 






Frederking, Jacqueline 41, 53 

Frost, Michael 57 

Gadzala, Francine 102 

Gallagher, Brian 63 

Gannon, Edward 34, 46 

Gannon, William 46 

Gardner, Virginia 12, 36 

Garland, Frank 12, 38, 39, 74, 7778^11 

Garnica, Olga 23, 40, 41, 70, 78, 91, 95, 97, 

122, 127 J- 

Garoutte, James 57 f 

Garren, Gerald 85 
Gaumond, Anita 127 
Gawrysh, Carolyn 37, 46, 80, 102, 114 
Ghanayem, Alexander 62, 63, 68, 80, 99, 

102, 109 
Giancola, Laura 24 
Gillenwater, John 41 
Givens, Gary 65 
Glimco, James 68 
Glynn, Annamarie 127 
Golden, John 39, 46 
Gomez, Juvenal 63, 78 
Gorman, Mary 74, 75, 96 
Gorski, Cynthia 80 
Grabinski, JoAnna 127 
Grdinic, Mary 79 
Grennan, Carla 37 
Grobe, Sharon 39 
Gruzdis, Bridget 68, 128 
Gura, Jeffrey 92, 128 

ura, Joseph 92 

utchewsky, Thomas 60 
Guth, Mark 128 

aim, Michelle 41, 72 
panneman, Mary 109 

'annon, Paul 128 
Hansen, Kenneth 41, 46, 72, 97 
Hantsch, Joseph 102 
Harty, Lora 90 
Harvey, Gary 41, 81, 128 
Hawkins, James 22 
Hedin, Marianne 29, 84, 89, 102 
Hennessy, Joseph 14, 80, 102, 103, 109, 128 
Henry, Jeffrey 32, 39, 46, 88 
Herlihey, Donna 41, 82, 85, 129, 131, 139 
Hinley, Gerard 41, 63 
Hnilicka, Jeanne 37, 74, 80, 100, 102 
Hogan, Mary 37 
Holley, Rodell 21 
Hrustek, Ann 129 
Huffman, Thomas 46, 63 
Huie, Patricia 79 
Hurley, Mary 48. 49 
Ivkovich, Anthony 50 
Jablonski, Mark 80, 102 
Jakubowski, Gary 46 
James, Manuel 46 
Janecke, Julie 28, 41, 97, 122, 129 
Jankowski, Judith 72 
Jarvis, Melinda 129 




Jayne, Timothy 50, 57. 129 

Jenkins, Mary Lynn 129 

Jenkins, Michael 46 

Jerger, Steven 93 

Jirka, Meredith 79. 80 

Johnson. Donald 41. 57 

Johnson, Edward 80 

Johnson, Linda 41, 85, 94, 129, 131 

Johnson, Robert 34 

Jones, Daryl 46 

Jurkovic. Edward 60 

Kakavas. Peter 80, 81 

Kalbfleisch, Mary 41 

Karpowicz, John 46, 56, 57 

Kassay, A. Kevin 80 

Kavanagh, James 29, 61 

Kavanaugh, Kevin 35, 60 

Kavanaugh, Michael 33, 68, 70. 75, 81, 

129 
Keating. Daniel 24, 39 
Keblusek. Mary 36, 55 
Keely. Catherine 38, 39 
Keenan. Partick 46 
Kehoe, Keith 110 
Kelly, John 50 
Kelly. Thomas 50. 57 
Kennedy. John 33, 111 
Kern, Albert 57 
Khan. Iqbal 50. 81 
Kiely, Mary 79 
Kilroy, Gerard 41, 55, 72 
King, Todd 76, 78 
Kirchner, Joseph 41, 97 
Kirkland, Elizabeth 6, 129 
Klamerus, Jane 37 
Kiamerus, Katherine 41 
Klimek, Mark 35, 60, 82 
Kliver. Donna 20, 68 
Knox. Betsy 39, 58, 102 
Knox, Cynthia 41. 93, 129 
Kogler, Timothy 46 
Kolar, Edwin 41, 57 
Kolich. Barbara 72 
Koo, Johnny 35 
Kowalski, Susan 58 
Kowalzyk, Daniel 22, 1 
Koal. Paul 73 
Kozubowski. Kenneth 35 
Kozubowski, Sandra 18, 23, 37, 72 
Krajewski. Brian 41, 129 
Krebs. John 46 
Krizic, Jeffrey 57, 130 
Krol, Joseph 41 
Kruzich, Katherine 109, 128 
Kuesis, Bruce 41, 81, 90, 92 
Kugia, Nicholas 72 
Kujawa, Kraig 41 
Kuratko, Deeny 44 
Kurator. John 46, 62, 63 
Kurcab, Gregory 41, 57 
Kus, Elizabeth 40 
Labus, Leeann 37, 75, 81, 137 



HI, 




H; LaLonde, Lawrence 80, 102 
^* LaMargo, Michael 41 
LaMotte, Lori 68, 89 
Landers, Kevin 25, 93 
Langdon, Philip 57 
LaScala, Elizabeth 37 
LaScala, Paul 50 
p~" Launch. Mark 46, 47, 57 
Lavand. Kenneth 57 
Lawshe, Patricia 37 
Ledvora. Sandra 58, 59 
Lee, Karen 32, 39, 88, 114 
Lee, Mark 130 
Lewis, David 35 
Lillig, Katharine 74, 76, 77, 83 
Limberis, Magdaiine 20, 37, 72, 147 
Linden, Joan 79 
Lindenmeyer. Pamela 79 
Lisy, Catherine 39, 78, 84, 98 
Litwin, Victor 39, 89 
Logan, William 63 
Lopez, David 6, 21, 97 
Lustyk, Ginamarie 37 
Lux, Jeffrey 78 
Luzader, Terri 39 
Maize, Teresa 39 
Mandru, Douglas 46 
Manning, Jeanne 22, 72 
Marchese, Paul 40, 61, 63, 97 
Marchetto, Jane 27 

Markun, Annette 41, 70, 79, 102, 1 10, 146 
Marley, Joseph 46, 57 
Marnen, Denise 68 
Marsala, Domenica 68 
Marsh, Brian 46 
Marshall, John 20, 28, 41, 54, 55, 68, 69, 85, 

87, 95, 99, 102, 110, 130, 131 
Martinek, Laura 58, 59 
Martinka, Terence 68, 69, 76, 77, 84, 99 
Martirano, Michael 34, 35, 80, 82 
McCain, Anthony 63 
McCarthy, Susan 6, 21, 74, 75, 1 1 1 
McCurrie, Michael 130, 131, 137 
McDonnell, Robert 41 
McGuire, William 18 
Mclnerney, Rosanne 79 
McKay, Bernard 55, 73 
McKendry, Jeffrey 46 
McKenna, Michael 46 
McLain, Mary 130 
McLarly, Kathleen 130 
McNally, Edward 41, 46 
McShane, Patricia 79 
Medland, Jeffrey 22, 32, 41, 79, 88, 94, 130, 

132 
Meek. Pamela 79 
Melin, Martin 33, 46 
Mena. Diane 97 
Mendez, Grace 1 14 
Menke, Marcia 19, 32, 37, 88, 91 
Menolasino, Michael 33, 60, 80 
Mertz, Robert 34 



Michaels, Richard 41 

Miklosz, Mark 35, 73 

Miksch, Cathleen 130 

Miller, Carol 23, 55, 98, 130, 131 

Miller, James 41, 57 

Mitchell, Marion 68 jj 

Molyneaux, Carl 39, 68, 74, 82 T 

Montefalco, Philip 7, 32, 35, 80, 82, 88. 99. 

109, 110 
Moore. Philip 21, 32, 88 
Moran, William 38. 39 
Morris, Jacqueline 44, 72, 137 
Mosley. Robert 41, 68, 73, 85, 96, 130. 137 
Mozwecz, David 109, 130 
Mraz, Laura 39, 80 
Muchna, Christine 48, 49 
Mulcahy, Patrick 102 
Murphy, Michael 41 
Murphy, Regina 63, 77, 82, 130 
Murray. Michael 55. 63 
Murray. Thomas 33, 68, 71. 110 
Myczek, James 92 
Nadolski. Carol 52, 53. 58. 102. 109 
Nagle, Patrick 57 
Nardella. Angelo 104 
Nasshan. Timothy 41 
Nelmark. Todd 46, 68. 73. 88. 91. 97 
Nesnidal. Thomas 79. 131 
Neylon, Daniel 16 
Nicholas, John 80 
Nickels, Connie 37, 75, 112 
Nickl, Steven 46 
Nolan, Pamela 81 
Norton, Donald 65 
Novak, Gail 14 
Novak, James 41, 46 
Novak, Jeffrey 79 
Novak, Paula 18, 31 
Nunez, Alfred 6, 1 1, 20, 26, 33, 60, 68, 78. 

89, 131 
O'Brien, Francis 6, 27, 68, 70, 80, 89, 99, 109 
O'Brien, Timothy 41, 46, 90 
O'Connell, Michael 102 
O'Connor. Sean 46, 91, 93, 131 
O'Connor, Thomas 41, 46, 72 
O'Donnell, John 41, 132 
Olenek, Michael 63, 74, 96 
Olson, Ginny 7, 20, 25, 37, 48, 72, 91, 92, 

147 
Olson, Holly 25 
O'Malley, Bernadette 19 
O'Neill, Ann 41 
Overton, Anita 78 
Owens, Vernon 47 
Ozog, Joseph 27, 60 
Pak, Ho Sung 21, 75, 92 
Palacious, Miguel 60, 127, 132 
Palatinus, Stephen 80 
Patel, Aruna 79 
Pell, Mark 65 

Pencak, Maureen 21,41, 68, 70, 99, 108, 1 10 
Perez, Ignacio 39. 56, 57 



Pericht, Patrick 46, 73 

Perlowski, Robert 80 

Perrone, Patty 37 

Peskor, Mark 35, 60 

Peterson, Charles 18 

Petrick, Sherri 39, 44, 45 

Petty, Todd 46, 90 

Pictor, Nancy 100 

Plaehn, Scott 33, 57, 71, 80 

Plys, Vicky 41, 70, 108. 110 

Pochos. Andrew 46 

Popielewski, Thaddeus 50 

Possley. Joseph?. 41.46. 68, 73, 91, 132, 137 

Powell, Jean 39, 44 

Praski, Raymond 46 

Prehn, Margaret 41, 74, 1251" 

Provelzale, Donald 41, 60, 68/69, T32 

Przybyla, Kathleen 109, 126, 132 

Pudlo. Julie 41, 90, 132 

Pujals, Javier 100 

Pullano, Linda 39, 58, 78. 84, 98 

Purcell. Norbert 33 

Putz, Constance 41. 70. 132 

Pytlarz, Deborah 132 ■*- 

Pytlik, Donna 68, 78 

Rausch, Catherine 76 

Rausch, David 35 

Reinert, John 41, 46. 91. 

Reinert, Tracey 48. 49 

Rinella. Dawn 133 

Robbins, Victor 46 

Robertson, Richard 35 

Rodzak, Michele 37, 84 ' 

Ross, Charles 78 

Ross. Rosann 80 

Rossi. Lynn 89 

Rozner. Susan 37, 81, 97 

Ruff. Thomas 15. 22. 46. 70. 80, 91, 109 

Rumoro. Dmo 6. 27. 33. 75. 80. 99, III 

Runavich. Cathleen 91 

Runavich, James 39, 46 

Rungc, Frederick 24, 94, 1 10, 133 

Rupkalvis, Richard 28, 39, 81, 82, 110 

Russell, Catherine 109 

Russell, Kevin 41 

Russell, Patricia 44, 58 

Russell, Thomas 55. 73. 85, 102, 103, 133 

Ryan, Brendan 133 

Ryan, Joyce 52. 53, 58 

Sablick, Renee 133 

Saunders, Joseph 46, 85 

Scaletta, Karen 24,94, 133 

Schmelzer, Edward 18. 35 

Schuiz, Christine 133 

Schulz, Rita 41, 52, 53, 58, 59, 102 

Schuttler. Fred 46 

Schwarz, Mary Jo 15, 133 

Schweikart, Jay 133 

Sciackitano, Donald 24, 35, 57, 100 

Scialabba, Anthony 74, 83 

Sehl, George 63 

Sestak, Andrew 41, 46 








m 



Severyns. Joan 21 

Shea, Kalhryn 46, 99 

Sheridan. Michael 4!, 55. 90. 134 

Singleton, Eddie 50 

Sinz. Mark 41, 50 

Skarbek, Robert 134 

Slezak, Lisa 134 

Slinkman, David 46, 102 

Smith, Stephen 46, 47 t 

Socha, James 41, 63, 70, 134 

Soltis, Marie 41, 52, 53, 134, 139 

Soltis, Scott 65 

Sommer. Kenneth 76 

Sommers, Daniel 50 

Spies, Michael 46 

Spokas, Philip 83, 85 

Stablein, Robert 41, 55, 102 

Stanford, Nicole 65 

Stanglewicz, Maria 74 

Staniszewski, Stephen 41, 68, 89 

Staten, Jane 39, 53, 58 

Stec, David 110 

Steele, William 21 

Stein, Catherine 68, 77, 82, 128, 134, 139, 

145 
Stella, Joseph 41, 68, 81, 134 
Stella, Ronals 81 

Steslow, Richard 41, 68, 69, 89, 127, 134 
Stevenson, Rose 134, 139 
St. Germaine, Don 35 
Stiglianese, Catherine 25, 77, 93, 101, 102, 

110 
Stoll, Thomas 35, 65 
Stoming, Christopher 46 
Stoops, Daniel 70 



Stopka, Phyllis 37 ■ & % 

Strevell, Eileen 55, 77, 85, 95, 131, 134 

Stuever, Maureen 13, 14, 37, 71, 72 

Sugrue, Kerry 19, 37 ■■■>^^-. 

Sullivan, Richard 34 '^fc 

Summins, Raymond 41 

Svacina, Frank 46 

Svec, Marcianne 41, 68, 70, 95, 135 

Swanston, Thomas 135 

Sweeney, Ann 48, 78, 85, 95, 107, 135 

Sweeney, Barbara 74, 96 

Sweeney, Kathleen 78, 107 

Swyndroski, Darlene 79 

Szum, David 74, 96, 97, 99, 109 

Szum, Michelle 79, 98, 102 

Tarkowski, Raymond 55 

Terry, Brent 132, 135 

Thompson, Anne 68, 124, 135 

Thompson, Leigh 13, 18, 37, 44 

Thompson, Paul 74, 83, 135 

Tierney, Ann 83, 136 

Tikusis, Daniel 61, 109 

Timoney, Laura 44, 53, 58, 59 

Toennies, David 29, 41 

Tomsky, Linda 65, 109, 136 

Toth, Veronica 80 

Tracy, Robert 41, 63, 70, 90, 93, 136 

Trok, Melissa 36, 37, 80 

Trumbull, George 7, 62, 63, 95, 99 

Tudisco, Judith 72 

Turk, Annmarie 136 

Ubl, Larry 41, 68, 73 

Usselman, Richard 79 
Vacante, Mary Ann 22 
Vainisi, Carl 46, 47. 85 




Velligan, Gregory 136 

Vitale, Mary 41, 91, 136 

Vitale, Robert 46 

Vlastnik, Vikki 80, 89, 1 1 1 

Vokurka, Mary Rose 18, 28, 37, 48, 101 

Vranicar, Mark 46 

Wagner, Donald 46, 136 

Wagner, John 35, 46, 57 

Walent, Douglas 46 

Wanadit, Sivika 37 

Wanadit, Voraporn 37, 83 

Ward, Elizabeth 41, 72 

Weber, Kathy 22, 37, 97 

Wedig, Frank 84 

Wedoff, Nancy 37 

Wenckus, Mary Jo 102, 103 

West, Christopher 54, 55 

Westenberger, Nancy 32, 88, 89 

Whalen, Margaret 95, 136 

White, Thomas 46 

Widlowski, James 33 

Wieser, Thomas 136 

Wijas, David 41, 50, 51, 136, 137 '' 

Wilder, William 35, 83 

Winkler, Michael 35, 60 

Wojcik, Ann 39 

Wojcik, William 25, 41, 77, 85, 88, 136 

Wong, Mary 17, 80, 109 

Wygonski, Anthony 50, 51 

Yearian, Joel 46 

Yeh, Lisa 80 

Yost, Judy 41, 52, 53, 136 

Zaenger, Ian 102 



Apologies are extended to those whom we were unable to identify. The Yearbook Staff. 



This book is dedicated to you, the IBC community. Without you, there would have been no stories to tell, no journeys to 
travel, no striving, achieving, jovial, or tender moments to capture. There would have been no Shining Memories . . . 
only painfully barren sheets of paper. 



A Warm Round of 
Applause Please 



CATHERINE STEIN 

The Chief 
Editor 



JEFF BRAMBORA 



Second in Command 
Photography Editor, Bartender 



REGINA MURPHY 

JEFF BRAMBORA 

EILEEN STREVELL 

ALEX GHANAYEM 

ANN SWEENEY 

MARY WONG 

KATHY KRUZICH 

KATHY LILLIG 

TIMM JAYNE 

BILL WOJCIK 

TERENCE MARTINKA 

MICHELLE HALM 



Staff 

PHIL MONTEFALCO 
GEORGE TRUMBULL 



ALEX GHANAYEM 

FRANK GARLAND 
CATHERINE STEIN 
EILEEN STREVELL 
KATHY SWEENEY 
MIKE KAVANAUGH 
ANN O'NEILL 
CONNIE NICKELS 
JAVIER PUJALS 



Photographers 



FRANK GARLAND 



Darkroom Supervisor 



JIM TWEEDY 



Poets 



Wyci<off Portraits Rep. 



CATHY STIGLIANESE 



KIM JENKINS 



Artist Herff Jones Rep. 

Kay Hetherington, Frank O'Brien, Jim Bond, Dan Tikusis, CANDOR. Communications Office 
(Gerry Czerak, Maura Walsh), Alumni Office (Fr. Stanley Veselsy), Marcia Menke, Cathy Russell, 
Donna Herlihey, Larry Bettag, Annette Markun, Barbara Berhard, Gloria Tysl, Bro. Sebastian 
Kuhn, Mr. Thomas Dyba, Rose Stevenson, Marci Svec 

Photo Donors 

Karen Lee, Janis Vacca, Bruno Berszoner, Mary Hanneman, Vikki Vlastnik, Tony Bell, Maura Stein, 
Melinda Antoskiewicz, Liz Kus. Marie McGrath, Dave Striker. Jeff Medland, Vince Barlow 

Assistants 



/ sincerely thank my staff for their friendship, time, dedication, understanding when my patience ..^. 
thin, and for ' coming through for me' in the end. To Bro. Finian, my friend and advisor. I thank you fc 
believing in me. 



wore 
for 



With a tear in my eye, a knot in my throat, and a diploma in my hand, I take my final bow, and exit. 

Catherine Stein 



9